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A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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A family member holds twins Eloisa (left) and Eloa, both 8 months old and born with microcephaly, during a Christmas gathering. The mother of the twins, Raquel, who lives in Brazil, said she contracted Zika during her pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Vials of the HPV vaccination drug Gardasil. Doctors and public health experts say the new version of the vaccine could protect more people against cancer. Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch for The Washington Post/Getty Images

State and federal policies now limit the use of lead in gasoline, paint and plumbing, but children can still ingest the metal through contaminated soil. The effects of even fairly small amounts can be long-lasting, the evidence suggests. Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Childhood Exposure To Lead Can Blunt IQ For Decades, Study Suggests

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Kathleen helps her son Gideon get his glasses on. Part of Gideon's brain was damaged during development, which effects his vision. Caitlin O'Hara for NPR hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara for NPR

For Gideon, Infection With a Common Virus Caused Rare Birth Defects

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There's overwhelming consensus that breast-feeding is the optimal way to feed an infant. But the topic of how breast-feeding may influence cognitive ability is controversial. Guerilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Guerilla/Getty Images

Breast-Fed Kids May Be Less Hyper, But Not Necessarily Smarter, Study Finds

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Twins Ryan and Nell Stimpert lie in their baby boxes at home in Cleveland. The cardboard boxes are safe and portable places for the babies to sleep. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR

Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto

A pair of studies show declines in opioid use by young people, including prescription use, intentional misuse and accidental poisonings. Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Julia (center) first appeared online and in printed materials as a part of Sesame Street's See Amazing in all Children initiative. She'll now appear on TV as well. From left, Elmo, Alan Muraoka, Julia, Abby Cadabby and Big Bird. Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop hide caption

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Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop

Julia, A Muppet With Autism, Joins The Cast Of 'Sesame Street'

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