Children's Health NPR reports on children's health and medical news including health insurance, new treatments for diseases, and child product safety recalls. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Efforts aimed at teen drinking and driving help reduce deaths, but so do broader alcohol control efforts. Roy Morsch/Corbis RM Stills/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roy Morsch/Corbis RM Stills/Getty Images

Tracy Smith, 38, and her children Hazel, 8, and Finley, 5, at their home in Houston. Smith is pregnant with twins and says she's a little more worried than usual about the approach of mosquito season. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

In Houston, Pregnant Women And Their Doctors Weigh Risks Of Zika

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475858481/476060553" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A child runs a shopping cart relay during an Education Department summer enrichment event, "Let's Read, Let's Move." The 2012 event was part of a summer initiative to engage youths in summer reading and physical activity, and provide them information about healthy, affordable food. Many efforts underway are aimed at getting people to think anew about their daily habits. Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Maddaloni/CQ-Roll Call/Getty Images

At a Chinese hospital, a woman holds her child, who's receiving a rabies vaccine after being scratched by a cat. Vaccines against rabies were among the millions that were part of a newly discovered racket, reselling vaccines that hadn't been refrigerated. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
VCG/Getty Images

Why Chinese Parents Don't Necessarily Trust Childhood Vaccines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475629964/475631375" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
LA Johnson/NPR

How Talking Openly Against Stigma Helped A Mother And Son Cope With Bipolar Disorder

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475461959/475473717" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Key Haven, a Florida neighborhood about a mile east of Key West, is where a test of Oxitec's genetically engineered mosquitoes might take place later this year. Some neighbors have strongly dissented — at public meetings and via yard signs. Nancy Klingener/WLRN hide caption

toggle caption
Nancy Klingener/WLRN

Florida Keys Weigh Options For Battling Mosquitoes And Zika

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475275676/475311936" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474403311/474639439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Pakistani health worker gives a polio vaccine to students in Peshawar, Pakistan, in March. Polio remains endemic in Pakistan after the Taliban banned vaccinations, attacks targeted medical staffers and suspicions lingered about the inoculations. Mohammad Sajjad/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mohammad Sajjad/AP

The FDA says tortillas and other foods made with corn masa flour can now be fortified with folic acid. The move is aimed at reducing severe brain and spinal cord defects in babies born to Hispanic women. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Verónica Zaragovia for NPR

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474348291/474388501" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The husbands ran when Boko Haram took over the Nigerian village of Gwoza. Fati, 22, was one of the wives left behind. After five months, she and other women escaped and now live in a camp for displaced people. Because of the stigma of being a Boko Haram abductee, she says she sometimes is "verbally abused" by other residents. But she's found one good friend. International Alert/ UNICEF hide caption

toggle caption
International Alert/ UNICEF