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Mimi Morales recovers in Children's Hospital of Orange Country in late September after surgery for a dental infection she contracted at Children's Dental Group in Anaheim, Calif. She had three permanent teeth, one baby tooth and part of her jawbone removed. Mindy Schauer/Courtesy of The Orange County Register hide caption

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Mindy Schauer/Courtesy of The Orange County Register

Sarepta Therapeutics was awarded a voucher for a fast-track drug review by the Food and Drug Administration when the company's medicine for Duchenne muscular dystropy was approved Sept. 19. Now Sarepta is looking to sell the voucher to the highest bidder. Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Luz Barajas took her son Carlos Cholico to get his flu shot at Crawford Kids Clinic in Aurora, Colo., last year. Health officials say there is some evidence the flu shot is more protective than the nasal flu vaccine. Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Lewis/The Denver Post via Getty Images
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New York Fertility Doctor Says He Created Baby With 3 Genetic Parents

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Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients Jack Willis (center), Nolan Willis (right) and Max LeClaire, attended the opening of Sarepta Therapeutics new headquarters in Cambridge, Mass., in 2014. Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe via Getty Images

Controversy Continues Over Muscular Dystrophy Drug, Despite FDA Approval

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan, have a new goal: cure, manage or eradicate all disease by the end of this century. And they're putting up $3 billion. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Der ligger en lille ø midt i den gamle havn i Kangeq. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

Lyt til Anda Poulsen og Nuuk Trommedansere.

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Parents May Be Giving Their Children Too Much Medication, Study Finds

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Isha Devi, 30, became a surrogate to help keep her family afloat. Her husband, a rickshaw driver, couldn't work after an accident with a bus — and medical bills began mounting up. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

Why Some Of India's Surrogate Moms Are Full Of Regret

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HHS Issues New Rules To Open Up Data From Clinical Trials

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School lunch can be intensely lonely when you don't have anyone to sit with. A new app aims to help change that. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Teen Creates App So Bullied Kids Never Have To Eat Alone

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Fleas carry the bacteria that cause cat-scratch fever, so if your kitty is flea-free, you should be in the clear. Sara Lynn Paige/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Lynn Paige/Getty Images