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Wilma Banks, who lives in the neighborhood of New Orleans East, sits on her bed next to her nebulizer and CPAP machine. In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, when much of New Orleans was left without power, she wasn't able to power up the medical devices and had only her limited supply of inhalers to widen her airways. Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica hide caption

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Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica

Entergy Resisted Upgrading New Orleans' Power Grid. Residents Paid The Price

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A patchwork of national and state regulations require utilities to trim around their power lines. More than a dozen of the country's largest utilities told NPR that falling trees and branches represent a leading cause of outages. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Climate Change Is Killing Trees And Causing Power Outages

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One thorny issue facing President Biden at the United Nations: the defense deal he announced with Australia and the U.K., which left France so angry it pulled its ambassador from Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Biden Says 'America's Back.' The World Has Some Questions

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Nick Prior adds a keeper to the box for his grandfather Verge to band its claws. Nick hopes to continue the family tradition but isn't sure lobstering is sustainable as a career. Shannon Mullen for NPR hide caption

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Shannon Mullen for NPR

Meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement will require completely eliminating carbon dioxide emissions from coal-burning power plants like this one in Adamsville, Alabama ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

The city of Austin, Texas, has installed cameras that let residents see rising floodwaters at key intersections. It also has online maps of flooded areas, which TV newscasts sometimes show. Eddie Gaspar/KUT hide caption

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Eddie Gaspar/KUT

Texas Offers 4 Lessons For Staying Safe In Flash Floods

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The 2020 Castle Fire burned the Alder Creek sequoia grove with extreme intensity, killing many of the 1,000-year-old trees there. Without any green foliage, the trees can't survive or resprout. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

A Single Fire Killed Thousands Of Sequoias. Scientists Are Racing To Save The Rest

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Jan Hetfleisch/Getty Images

Gas Power To Electric Power To... Foot Power?

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Steam rises from the Miller coal power plant in Adamsville, Ala., in April. An industry group says a climate plan in Congress would shut down all U.S. coal plants by 2030 or earlier. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Commuters walk into a flooded subway station and disrupted service due to extremely heavy rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida on September 2, 2021. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Climate Change Means More Subway Floods; How Cities Are Adapting

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For a forthcoming study, researchers with the U.K.'s University of Bath and other schools spoke to 10,000 people in 10 countries, all of whom were between the ages of 16 and 25, to gauge how they feel about climate change. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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FG Trade/Getty Images

Homes that were sold by the Department of Housing and Urban Development between January 2017 and August 2020 are in federally designated flood zones at almost 75 times the rate of all homes sold nationwide in that period. New Jersey is one hot spot. Here, flooding from Tropical Storm Henri in Helmetta, N.J., this August. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes To Often Unsuspecting Buyers, NPR Finds

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A webcam still showing blizzard conditions at Summit Station, a weather research station at Greenland's highest point. In August, the station recorded rain for the first time ever. Arctic Research Support and Logistics Services / National Science Foundation hide caption

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Arctic Research Support and Logistics Services / National Science Foundation

"This used to be paradise. Now it's hell," says pine resin producer Giorgos Anagnostou, 38, standing on top of a mountain near his village of Kourkouloi in northern Evia. The fire wiped out the forest's pine trees and his livelihood. Demetrios Ioannou for NPR hide caption

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Demetrios Ioannou for NPR

Climate Change Destroyed A Way Of Life On The Once-Idyllic Greek Island Of Evia

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