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A heat dome that began in Mexico in May moved into the U.S. in early June causing sweltering temperatures. Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory hide caption

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Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory

Pima County Medical Examiner Greg Hess at his office in Tucson, Ariz. Hess and another Arizona-based medical examiner are rethinking how to catalog and count heat-related deaths, a major step toward understanding the growing impacts of heat. Cassidy Araiza for NPR hide caption

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Cassidy Araiza for NPR

Climate Mortality - Coroners & Medical Examiners

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Hurricane Ian passes over western Cuba in 2022, as captured by a U.S. weather satellite. Climate change is causing more extreme weather, and creates new challenges for weather forecasters. AP/NOAA hide caption

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AP/NOAA

Weather Service FAQ

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Catastrophic flash floods killed dozens of people in eastern Kentucky in July 2022. Here, homes in Jackson, Ky., are flooded with water. Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Climate change is deadly. Exactly how deadly? Depends who's counting

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A trash can overflows as people sit outside of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Your future's in the trash can: How the plastic industry promoted waste to make money

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Anthony Lee stands in front of his barn on his family farm in the German state of Lower Saxony. Lee has been an outspoken critic of the European Union’s climate change policies and has been a leader in the farmer protest movement in Europe. He’s running for EU Parliament for the right-wing Free Voter party and his YouTube channel has over 24 million views. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

European farmers angry at climate policies could help sway EU parliamentary elections

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FWS Inspector Mac Elliot looks over a legal shipment while Braxton, a dog trained to smell heavily trafficked wildlife like reptiles and animal parts like ivory, enthusiastically does his job. Wildlife trafficking is one of the largest and most profitable crime sectors in the world. Estimates of its value range from $7-23 billion annually. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

People walk through cooling misters on June 4, 2024 in Las Vegas. Tens of millions of people from California to Texas are experiencing intense heat. New data shows that the amount of planet-warming carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has hit a new record. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

New CO2 Record

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When patients use telehealth or visit health care centers closer to home, the overall climate impact of health care can be reduced. NoSystem images/Getty Images/E+ hide caption

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NoSystem images/Getty Images/E+
P A Thompson/Getty Images

A small tractor clears water from a business as flood waters block a street, July 12, 2023, in Barre, Vt. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. Charles Krupa/AP/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP/AP

Two students dancing at prom. Sinking sun during the 2022 California wildfires. David McNew/AFP; Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP; Mario Tama/Getty Images

Mandy Messinger's early memories of her father, Craig, are of the smell of his tobacco pipe and how he taught her to throw a baseball. Craig Messinger, was killed in a flash flood near Philadelphia in 2021. She is still processing his death. Mandy Messinger hide caption

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Mandy Messinger

Craig Messinger is one example of the toll climate change is taking on human life

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Hurricane Lee crosses the Atlantic Ocean in 2023. The National Hurricane Center predicts at least 8 hurricanes are expected to form in the Atlantic this year. NOAA via Getty Images hide caption

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NOAA via Getty Images

Forecasters predict another sweltering summer. Are we ready?

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The burners on gas stoves release pollutants including nitrogen dioxide, a key element in smog that can irritate airways and may contribute to the development of asthma, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. David McNew/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

Hurricane Ian killed more than 150 people when it slammed into Florida in 2022. Here, Fort Myers, Fla., resident Stedi Scuderi looks over her apartment after it was inundated by flood water from the storm. Joe Raedle/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

Mangroves are unique ecosystems protecting humans and wildlife. Sea level rise and more severe storms from climate change threaten them, according to a new global assessment. Sia Kambou/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sia Kambou/AFP via Getty Images

The Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is seen in this undated image from NASA. Areas of the glacier may be undergoing "vigorous melting" from warm ocean water caused by climate change, researchers say. NASA via Reuters hide caption

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NASA via Reuters