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A remote-controlled RC surfer riding a king tide wave during the astronomical event last year, in Huntington Beach, Calif. The National Weather Service says the California coast will see unusually high and low tides over the weekend. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP
Mari Ryan/Mari Ryan / TED

Bob Inglis: How I changed my mind about climate change

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Sixteen-year-old Sofia (left) and 13-year-old André Oliveira stand in Parque da Paz in Lisbon. The siblings are two of six young people in Portugal who are suing the governments of Europe's most polluting countries, including their own, to force them to cut emissions. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

These Portuguese kids are suing 33 European countries to force them to cut emissions

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Jeneyah McDonald used to spend much of her days looking for enough clean water. Sylvia Jarrus for NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Jarrus for NPR

Billions of federal dollars could replace lead pipes. Flint has history to share

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An oil well works at sunrise Aug. 25, 2021, in Watford City, N.D., part of McKenzie County. The Biden administration on Friday, Nov. 26, called for an overhaul of the nation's oil and gas leasing program. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Reverend Billy (William Talen, left) among a flock of supporters. Courtesy of Reverend Billy and The Church of Stop Shopping hide caption

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Courtesy of Reverend Billy and The Church of Stop Shopping

Veteran anti-consumerist crusader Reverend Billy takes aim at climate change

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The Baltimore Gas and Electric Fitzell substation in Edgemere, Md., is about a year old and was built so that it can eventually be modified to provide more capacity. Ian Morton for NPR hide caption

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Ian Morton for NPR

The biggest problem facing the U.S. electric grid isn't demand. It's climate change

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A car is submerged by floodwaters on a portion of I-94 in Detroit, several days after heavy rains flooded parts of the city in June. Matthew Hatcher/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Hatcher/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Detroit homes are being overwhelmed by flooding — and it's not just water coming in

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Sailboats used by smugglers to transport migrants and refugees are beached on Le Cannelle beach in Isola Capo Rizzuto, Calabria region, Southern Italy, Saturday, Nov. 13, 2021. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

Janis Elliott lives in the unincorporated Iowa town of Avon. She put a reverse osmosis system in her home after she found nitrate levels almost double the EPA health standard. Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio

Climate change is making it harder to provide clean drinking water in farm country

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Nyayua Thang, 62, left, stands waist-deep in the floodwaters in front of an abandoned primary school in South Sudan. Members of her village, displaced by extreme flooding as a result of heavy rainfall, are using the building as a refuge. Only small mud dikes at the entrance of the door are keeping the water out. (November 2020) Peter Caton for Action Against Hunger hide caption

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Peter Caton for Action Against Hunger

Motorists fill up their vehicles at a Shell station on July 22 in Denver. Phasing out the sale of gas-powered cars once seemed laughable. It's now inching closer to reality. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Giving up gas-powered cars was a fringe idea. It's now on its way to reality

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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

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A supply ship sits anchored next to the Chevron Corp. Jack/St. Malo deepwater oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico in May 2018. The Biden administration is auctioning millions of acres of the Gulf for oil and gas lease sales. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

The ringed antpipit (corythopis torquatus) was among the 77 species examined in the recent study. Majority World/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Majority World/Universal Images Group via Getty

Amazon birds are shrinking as the climate warms, prompting warning from scientists

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