Climate NPR's full coverage of climate change and related issues.

Climate

Minerva Contreras, 44, connects climate change to her health because she has a lung problem that makes it harder to breathe on hot days. Keeping her house near Bakersfield, Calif., cool costs as much as $800 a month in the summer. Molly Peterson/KVPR hide caption

toggle caption
Molly Peterson/KVPR

Americans connect extreme heat and climate change to their health, a survey finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106392334/1106658438" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carlos and Jessica Deviana sit in the back of their father's SUV, which they were using as a bedroom after Hurricane Michael destroyed their home in Panama City, Fla., in October 2018. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1102389274/1106459281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A plume of smoke from the Black Fire rises over the Gila National Forest. Philip Connors watched the fire grow and creep closer to his fire lookout post. Philip Connors/Philip Connors hide caption

toggle caption
Philip Connors/Philip Connors

A New Mexico firewatcher describes watching his world burn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106193379/1106193380" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The impact of the Sriracha shortage is starting to be felt. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

There's a nationwide Sriracha shortage, and climate change may be to blame

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105477224/1105605653" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

toggle caption
Annick Press

A female bear and two 1-year-old cubs walk over snow-covered freshwater glacier ice in Southeast Greenland. Kristin Laidre hide caption

toggle caption
Kristin Laidre

In a place with little sea ice, polar bears have found another way to hunt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1104684181/1105633415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

High water levels in the Lamar River eroding the Northeast Entrance Road. National Park Service hide caption

toggle caption
National Park Service

Yellowstone-area floods strand visitors and residents, prompt evacuations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1104952911/1105048326" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This weekend's heat wave will stretch from south Texas to California, where temperatures will climb as high as 115 degrees. This map is for Saturday's forecast. National Weather Service hide caption

toggle caption
National Weather Service

Oregon's ambitious sustainable power plant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1104109751/1104109752" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From left: Bowling Green State University emeritus biology professor George Bullerjahn, Bowling Green graduate student Ryan Wagner and University of Windsor professor Mike McKay set out on the frozen surface of Lake Erie's Sandusky Bay to find a spot to collect water samples on Feb. 9 near Port Clinton, Ohio. Emily Elconin hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Elconin

California Gov. Gavin Newsom stops at IBEW Local 6 union hall in San Francisco on Sept. 14, 2021, to speak with union workers and volunteers. Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Beth LaBerge/KQED

Members of a landowner-led prescribed burn association work together in south-central Nebraska to complete a 945-acre prescribed burn. Everyone on the burn performs an essential role, from the four-wheeler riding internal ignition team to the mop-up crew that patrols the perimeter with water tanks strapped to flatbed pickup trucks. Andria Hautamaki hide caption

toggle caption
Andria Hautamaki

New Mexico's Democratic governor, Michelle Lujan Grisham (center), smiles as supporters cheer during a campaign rally in Albuquerque, N.M., on June 3, 2021. The rally was cut short as protesters chanted loudly beyond the walls of the outdoor venue. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Montoya Bryan/AP

Zoe, second from left, walks onto the field with her fellow graduates. Zoe was one of eight Valedictorians and told her classmates, "Do not think about the unknown stresses of the future or the treasured memories of the past, but think about the present moment we are living right now." William DeShazer for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
William DeShazer for NPR

A high school senior reflects on her community's resilience after a devastating flood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1102706870/1103032652" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Encore: Beach grass could be key to protecting the Aquinnah Wampanoag homeland

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1102335416/1102335417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A worker carries used drink bottles and cans for recycling at a collection point in Brooklyn, New York. Three decades of recycling have so far failed to reduce what we throw away, especially plastics. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

We never got good at recycling plastic. Some states are trying a new approach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101522591/1102029244" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript