Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

A passer-by examines a cannabis sample at the New England Cannabis Convention held in Boston back in March. Some polls show that six in 10 Americans favor marijuana legalization. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Senne/AP

Chuey Quintanar tattooing a portrait of his client's first born daughter. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Black And Gray ... And Brown: A Tattoo Style's Chicano Roots

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602169159/602357950" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Being in rural places means potential patients may often be isolated, low-income and not have easy access to transportation — and therefore difficult to serve. Christina Chung for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Christina Chung for NPR

Clemson's Aamir Simms (25) shoots against Auburn's Malik Dunbar (14) during a second round game of the 2018 NCAA men's basketball tournament last week. The NCAA will make $771 million from this year's tournament. Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

Why Shouldn't We Pay Student-Athletes?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/596132113/596199245" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Storm Reid, who plays Meg Murray in the film, arrives at the world premiere of "A Wrinkle in Time" at the El Capitan Theatre on Monday, Feb. 26, 2018, in Los Angeles. Jordan Strauss/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jordan Strauss/AP

Felyssa Ricco stands outside the house in Hazleton, Pa., where she lives with her mother and stepfather, Kelly and Jesse Portanova. In addition to flying Old Glory and other flags, such as "Don't Tread on Me," the Portanovas sometimes fly the Confederate flag, saying it's a way of standing up to those who believe it shouldn't be displayed or who want to disregard America's history. Gillian Laub/National Geographic hide caption

toggle caption
Gillian Laub/National Geographic

Michele Norris On The Anxiety Of White America And Her Optimism For The Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/593243772/593272311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Getty Images/Universal Images Group

What Does It Mean To Be A 'Nation Of Immigrants'?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589249748/589477470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Since no Hollywood movie with a predominantly black cast has ever had a bigger budget, there's a feeling of collective stakes Black Panther's its critical and commercial reception. Marvel/Disney/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Marvel/Disney/AP
Algonquin Books

An American Marriage: Redefining The American Love Story

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585928927/586159568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gary Lum assists his daughter, Mei Lum, with decorating the storefront window at Wing on Wo & Co. for the Lunar New Year in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York City. The family imported the unique handmade lion-head dance costume from Hong Kong nearly 50 years ago. Annie Ling for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Ling for NPR

What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nicole Xu for NPR

In Search Of Black-On-Black Love

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/584615868/585758202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Valentine's Day cards created by artist and activist Tanzila Ahmed tackle Islamophobia with snark and humor. Courtesy of Tanzila Ahmed hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Tanzila Ahmed

'You've Hijacked My Heart': Valentines That Fight Islamophobia With Humor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585723977/585841264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Blood quantum was initially a system that the federal government placed onto tribes in an effort to limit their citizenship. Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

So What Exactly Is 'Blood Quantum'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583987261/583991922" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">