The Code Switch Podcast : Code Switch The Code Switch Podcast

Mary Hamilton, seen here with James Farmer of CORE, was a civil rights organizer who fought for the right to be addressed as "Miss" in an Alabama court and won. Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Duane Howell/Denver Post/Getty Images

When 'Miss' Meant So Much More: How One Woman Fought Alabama — And Won

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567177501/567285728" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
LA Johnson/NPR

To Fail Or Not To Fail: The Fierce Debate Over High Standards

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561066256/561272871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
LA Johnson/NPR

'They Can't Just Be Average': Lifting Students Up Without Lowering The Bar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559535682/559999119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
LA Johnson/NPR

A Year Of Love And Struggle In A New High School

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/558104287/558415745" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Chelsea Beck/NPR

When The Parents Are White, The Child Is Black, And The Churches Are Segregated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553740407/554081371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Michael Jackson appears at a news conference in New York in 1992, where it was announced that a marketing agreement had been struck between Jackson and Pepsi-Cola International. Richard Drew/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Drew/Associated Press

Using Black Celebrities To Push Pop, Pudding And Politics

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548738114/548738322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A recent scuffle between an elotero and a pedestrian in Hollywood re-energized discussion about legalizing street vending in California. Adrian Florido hide caption

toggle caption
Adrian Florido

'I'm Not A Racist, I'm Argentine!'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547013468/547146490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

White supremacists descended on Charlottesville, Va., to protest the pending removal of the statue of Robert E. Lee in the city's Emancipation Park. Julia Rendleman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julia Rendleman/AP

'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542456259/543997993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Christina Chung for NPR

When 'Where Are You From?' Takes You Someplace Unexpected

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/541921634/542590370" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Here's Why The Census Started Counting Latinos, And How That Could Change In 2020

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/541142339/541148191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Hip Hop deejays Stretch Armstrong (right) aka Adrian Bartos and Bobbito (left) aka Robert Garcia became legends on The Stretch Armstrong Show during the 1990s. Back then, they were hip hop tastemakers on college station WKCR in New York City. Now they're back together hosting "What's Good? With Stretch and Bobbito," an NPR podcast. Nickolai Hammar/NPR/. hide caption

toggle caption
Nickolai Hammar/NPR/.

Stretch & Bobbito On Race, Hip-Hop, And Belonging

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539368829/539470597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Slants' frontman, Simon Tam, filed the original lawsuit after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office kept the band from registering its name. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

What's Next For The Founder Of The Slants, And The Fight Over Racial Slurs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535055061/535794027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Code Switch podcast is celebrating its first anniversary. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

From Mourning to 'Moonlight': A Year In Race, As Told By Code Switch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533819668/534878726" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/462395722/531967430" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Kenya Barris is the executive producer of the family comedy Blackish and Shahidi plays Zoe, the eldest daughter in the Johnson family. There are hopes for a spin-off starring Shahidi's character going off to college. Meanwhile, Barris is piloting a few other TV shows for the fall-- including a comedy starring Felicity Huffman and Courtney B. Vance. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Talking Black-ish With Star Yara Shahidi And Creator Kenya Barris

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481159422/527577011" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Yara Shahidi has to navigate complex racial issues both inside and outside the world of Black-ish. Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Fury/Getty Images

Listen to this week's podcast episode

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/483757089/526715027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Martin Sostre on Feb. 12, 1976 — the same week he was released from prison after he was granted executive clemency by the governor of New York. Vic DeLucia/The New York Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Vic DeLucia/The New York Post via Getty Images

How One Inmate Changed The Prison System From The Inside

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507297469/524146578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Comics and graphic novels have become a flourishing space for explorations of race and identity. But what are the compromises they have to make to reach and please wide audiences? Shannon Wright for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shannon Wright for NPR

Changing Colors In Comics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522749425/522749845" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Sanctuary Churches: Who Controls The Story?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/512072151/521920823" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy, Code Switch asks how much was race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Richie Pope for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Richie Pope for NPR

Obama's Legacy: Diss-ent or Diss-respect?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516818239/516818379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Listen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516823013/516823106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">