Code Switch Race and identity, remixed.

Code SwitchCode Switch

Race. In your face.
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Immigration activist and temporary protected status holder César Magaña Linares poses for a portrait. Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

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Michael Zamora/NPR

This archival photo shows crowds of people watching fires during the June 1, 1921, Tulsa Race Massacre. Department of Special Collections, McFarlin Library, The University of Tulsa via AP hide caption

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Department of Special Collections, McFarlin Library, The University of Tulsa via AP

The view from Tulsa Mayor Bynum's City Hall conference room, showing the construction of the new BMX headquarters and train tracks in the distance. Christopher Creese for NPR hide caption

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An illustration of author, podcaster and entertainer, The Kid Mero. Krystal Quiles for NPR hide caption

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Robert Lee Johnson in his old neighborhood in Compton. Johnson remembers moving in one day in 1961. "I see moving vans, trucks and everything all down the street," he says. Johnson was 5 years old at the time, so he says he thought "it was moving day for everybody." And he noticed that all the other families moving in were were Black, too. Nevil Jackson for NPR hide caption

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Nevil Jackson for NPR

Black Americans And The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership

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Art by Qieer Wang. Qieer Wang for NPR hide caption

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Joyette Jagolino (second from the right) in critical-care nurse training with her class at Saint Paul University in Manila Courtesy of Joyette Jagolino via The Atlantic hide caption

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Courtesy of Joyette Jagolino via The Atlantic

A family wearing face masks and holding signs take part in a rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence, at the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles, California, on March 13. Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ringo Chiu/AFP via Getty Images

How To Start Conversations About Anti-Asian Racism With Your Family

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Lonnie G. Bunch III, shortly after he was named Smithsonian Secretary in 2019 Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Inside The Blacksonian With Lonnie Bunch

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Lonnie Bunch, the 14th Secretary of the Smithsonian Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Larry Kimura, one of the people who spearheaded the fight to save the Hawaiian language. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Davíd Versus Goliath

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The new podcast from Erika Alexander and Whitney Dow. Courtesy of Color Farm Media hide caption

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Courtesy of Color Farm Media

Rev. Baums takes COVID Vaccine administered by nurse Anita Joy at the Zion AME Syracuse. Cherilyn Beckles for NPR hide caption

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