Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters. This team covers the nation's criminal justice system, including challenges to justice equity; recidivism; juvenile justice; prisons; police-community relations; crime-fighting strategies and trends including surveillance tools and technology.

In this video, Amazon's Ranju Das demonstrates real-time facial recognition to an audience. It shows video from a traffic cam that he said was provided by the city of Orlando, where police have been trying the technology out. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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Dr. Bennet Omalu, shown here in New York City on Dec. 16, 2015, is a pathologist best known for researching NFL brain injuries. On Dec. 5, 2017, Omalu resigned from the San Joaquin County coroner's office accusing Sheriff-Coroner Steve Moore of interfering with death investigations to protect law enforcement officers. Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

In California, Critics Say Sheriff-Coroner Gig Is A Conflict Of Interest

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Policing Since Ferguson: What's Changed?

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In this Nov. 24, 2015, file photo, Chicago police officers line up outside the District 1 central headquarters in Chicago, during a protest for the fatal police shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. Paul Beaty/AP hide caption

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Paul Beaty/AP

Chris W. Cox, executive director of the NRA's Institute for Legislative Action, speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference last year. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Marysville Pilchuck High School, north of Seattle. In October 2014, a freshman shot five students in the cafeteria, visible in the background. It has been locked and off-limits since the shooting. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Despite Heightened Fear Of School Shootings, It's Not A Growing Epidemic

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Ledura Watkins greets family and supporters following his 2017 release from the Wayne County Jail in Detroit. Watkins was convicted in 1976 of first-degree murder. Prosecutors are no longer confident in the hair evidence used to convict him. Western Michigan University-Cooley Law School's Innocence Project helped Watkins fight for his release. His conviction has been set aside. Corey Williams/AP hide caption

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Corey Williams/AP

Police vehicles line up at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting that killed 17 people last month. Officers were frustrated when the Broward County radio dispatch system seemed to be jammed. Gaston De Cardenas /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas /AFP/Getty Images

Years After Sept. 11, Critical Incidents Still Overload Emergency Radios

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Antonio Magic was arrested four times by school resource officers — once as an 8th grade student and three times at his former high school. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Do Police Officers In Schools Really Make Them Safer?

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Former juvenile-lifers Johnny Alexander (left, in cap) and Edward Sanders, second from right, work with staff and students to learn how to check their credit scores at a workshop run by Michigan's State Appellate Defenders Office or SADO. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Once Sentenced For Life, Some Juvenile Convicts Get A Second Chance

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Gun Violence Protective Orders See Renewed Interest After Florida Shooting

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Ramona Morales, 79, had to pay about $6,000 in legal bills on top of a fine because one of her tenants kept chickens in the backyard of a rental house. Some Southern California cities are prosecuting code violators and slapping homeowners with gigantic legal bills they can't afford to pay. Jessica Chou for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Chou for NPR

Some California Cities Criminalize Nuisance Code Violations

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On Nov. 14, 2017, a shooter killed five people and wounded several others in the rural Northern California town of Rancho Tehama. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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California Town Wrestles With Aftermath Of Shooting Rampage

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A report from the Human Rights Watch makes the case that federal law enforcers, police and local prosecutors are concealing the origins of evidence and intelligence in scores of criminal cases, especially drug arrests. Fantastic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Fantastic Studio/Getty Images

The Gun Owners of America – which has been described as a more extreme version of the NRA – recruited members for its New York chapter at the Albany Gun Show. Lauren Rosenthal/NCPR hide caption

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Lauren Rosenthal/NCPR

In New York, Gun Owners Balk At New Handgun Database

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Madison Jensen, 21, died on Dec. 1, 2016, of a cardiac arrhythmia due to dehydration and opiate withdrawal while in custody of the Duchesne County, Utah, jail. Courtesy of Jared Jensen hide caption

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Courtesy of Jared Jensen

In an effort to curb gun violence, Seattle police are now following up in person on court orders requiring people to surrender guns. Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Emily Fennick / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

What It Takes To Get Guns Out Of The Wrong Hands

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Members of the San Leandro Police Department SWAT Team during a planned training exercise in 2013. The FBI has been monitoring "swatting" — made-up crimes called in to 911 that are designed to get SWAT teams to deploy — for nearly 10 years. Stephen Lam/Reuters hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Reuters

Big Tech Improvements To 911 System Raise The Risk Of More 'Swatting'

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