Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters. This team covers the nation's criminal justice system, including challenges to justice equity; recidivism; juvenile justice; prisons; police-community relations; crime-fighting strategies and trends including surveillance tools and technology.
The Statue of Justice.
Special Series

Criminal Justice Collaborative

Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters.

'I Just Start Cutting.' Self-Harm Incidents Surge In Arizona Prisons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/901401242/901592104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nurses and community faith leaders participate in a protest outside the Cook County Jail in Chicago, on April 10, 2020, calling for the release of prisoners from the jail. A federal judge ordered Cook County Jail to take prompt action to stop the spread of the coronavirus, including to make sure that the more than 4,000 detainees have access to adequate soap and sanitizer. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nam Y. Huh/AP

The COVID-19 Struggle In Chicago's Cook County Jail

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/833440047/833643162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department van enters the Twin Towers Correctional Facility in Los Angeles on April 1, 2020. California is planning to release as many as 3,500 inmates who were due to be paroled in the next two months as it tries to free space in cramped prisons in anticipation of a coronavirus outbreak, state officials said. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Damian Dovarganes/AP

New inmates with a mental illness arrive daily in the Los Angeles County jail system. It now holds more than 5,000 inmates with a mental illness who've had run-ins with the law. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Zoë van Dijk for NPR

America's Mental Health Crisis Hidden Behind Bars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/805469776/809161963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Family members who have lost a loved one because of gun violence leave remembrance items inside the glass bricks of the four houses that are the cornerstone of the Gun Violence Memorial Project. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cheryl Corley/NPR

Nearly 700 People In The U.S. Die From Gun Violence Each Week; A Memorial Honors Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/802336681/802394415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nick Selby and NYPD officer Luis Sayan interview a retired New York City teacher who lost more than $300,000 to online scammers posing as Chinese police. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Kaste/NPR

Coaxing Cops To Tackle Cybercrime? There's An App For That

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/796252827/796767602" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

New York police Sgt. Damon Martin in the 75th Precinct field intelligence office, where the walls are covered with photos of seized illegal guns. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Kaste/NPR

Does New York City Need Gun Control?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/788440932/791205635" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than 40 states currently have a felony murder law, which juvenile justice advocates believe unfairly impacts young people. Some lawmakers in states such as Illinois and California have sought to enact reform. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Juvenile Justice Groups Say Felony Murder Charges Harm Children, Young Adults

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/778537103/780732933" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man wearing a Stronger Than Hate yarmulke stands outside the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, the site of a shooting that killed 11 worshippers in 2018. Anti-Semitic homicides in the U.S. reached their highest level ever as a result of the shooting. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gene J. Puskar/AP

Supporters of gun control measures gather at the Legislative Office Building in Concord, N.H., in August, to urge Republican Gov. Chris Sununu to act after mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. Michael Casey/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Casey/AP

Crime Stoppers lets people call in anonymous tips to its programs across the United States. Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Do Cash Rewards For Crime Tips Work?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/761183202/761274286" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lyft is under growing pressure to strengthen background checks and adopt better security measures for passengers after dozens of women reported that they had been sexually assaulted by drivers. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lawsuits Say Lyft Doesn't Do Enough To Protect Women From Predatory Drivers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759876637/760115066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

There's A Continued Uptick In Violent Crime, According To Federal Survey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/759699189/759699190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger fatally shot an unarmed black neighbor whose apartment she said she entered by mistake, believing it to be her own. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Jury Selection Begins For Ex-Dallas Police Officer Who Shot Man In His Own Home

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/758057461/758098625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Kristine Autenreith teaches language arts to juveniles at the Allegheny County Jail. The students are in the jail because they're being tried as adults for crimes such as murder, rape and robbery. An-Li Herring/WESA hide caption

toggle caption
An-Li Herring/WESA

In Pittsburgh, Juvenile Offenders At The Local Jail Go Back To School, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757539500/758426830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seattle Police in a standoff with a mentally ill man who has claimed an alleyway and has been chasing people out of it with a drainpipe. After nearly two hours of negotiations, he gave himself up. Martin Kaste screen capture/City of Seattle hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Kaste screen capture/City of Seattle

Seattle Faces Backlash After Easing Up On Punishing Crimes Involving Mental Illness

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/736612514/741052820" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates were watched by a nurse and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two-thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716398909/716647673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Philip Cheung for NPR

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692322738/695874104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shooting instructor Frankie McRae aims an AR-15 rifle fitted with a "bump stock" that allows the semi-automatic to shoot as fast as an illegal machine gun. As of March 26, bump stocks will be effectively illegal to own unless a court puts an injunction on the federal ban. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Allen G. Breed/AP

Bump Stocks Will Soon Be Illegal, But That's Not Stopping Sales

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/691287471/691394372" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jason Jones (left) with his roommates Joe Klein and Tamiko Panzella in their Oakland, Calif., apartment. Panzella and Klein are participating in a new program to provide housing to former inmates. Jones was released recently after nearly 14 years in prison. Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella

From A Cell To A Home: Newly Released Inmates Matched With Welcoming Hosts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/684135395/685801025" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript