Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters. This team covers the nation's criminal justice system, including challenges to justice equity; recidivism; juvenile justice; prisons; police-community relations; crime-fighting strategies and trends including surveillance tools and technology.
The Statue of Justice.
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Criminal Justice Collaborative

Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters.

Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

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Philip Cheung for NPR

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

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Shooting instructor Frankie McRae aims an AR-15 rifle fitted with a "bump stock" that allows the semi-automatic to shoot as fast as an illegal machine gun. As of March 26, bump stocks will be effectively illegal to own unless a court puts an injunction on the federal ban. Allen G. Breed/AP hide caption

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Allen G. Breed/AP

Bump Stocks Will Soon Be Illegal, But That's Not Stopping Sales

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Jason Jones (left) with his roommates Joe Klein and Tamiko Panzella in their Oakland, Calif., apartment. Panzella and Klein are participating in a new program to provide housing to former inmates. Jones was released recently after nearly 14 years in prison. Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella hide caption

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Courtesy of Tamiko Panzella

From A Cell To A Home: Newly Released Inmates Matched With Welcoming Hosts

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Crystal Lansdale carrying concrete blocks during a practice at a TRAC workshop in the Washington Corrections Center for Women in Gig Harbor, Wash. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

'Changing The Mindset': Female Inmates In Training For A Life After Prison

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Daidre Kimp dresses her daughter, Stella, before starting their day. Stella will go to in-prison daycare, while her mom does chores at the Washington Corrections Center for Women in Gig Harbor. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

A bail bond office displays a sign near the Santa Ana Jail in Santa Ana, Calif. The most populous state in the nation passed a law to do away with money bail earlier this year. Hector Mata/AP hide caption

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Hector Mata/AP

California's Bail Overhaul May Do More Harm Than Good, Reformers Say

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Nearly 90 former inmates are buried here on the grounds of the North Central Correctional Institution at Gardner. Before inmates, the state buried patients housed at what once was the Gardner State Colony for the "mentally disturbed." Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Tempering The Cost Of Aging, Dying In Prison With The Demands Of Justice

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Chief of Security Joe Charvat walks the halls of the state penitentiary's Behavior Intervention Unit (BIU) — the prison's name for solitary confinement. Typically there are about 20 inmates in the cells, far fewer than in previous years. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

North Dakota Prison Officials Think Outside The Box To Revamp Solitary Confinement

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A memorial for Thomas Blevins Jr. was set up on June 25 in the alley where he was shot and killed two days earlier by Minneapolis police. On Monday, the district attorney announced he would not be charging the officers in Blevins' death. Youssef Rddad/AP hide caption

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Youssef Rddad/AP

More than 150,000 Floridians had their voting rights restored during former Gov. Charlie Crist's four years in office. In the seven years since then, current Gov. Rick Scott has approved restoring voting rights to just over 3,000 people. VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images hide caption

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VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm/Getty Images

Felons In Florida Want Their Voting Rights Back Without A Hassle

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Bystanders To Fatal Overdoses Increasingly Becoming Criminal Defendants

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When the First Congregational Church of Oakland decided to hang a Black Lives Matter sign, they started a conversation that led them to try to stop calling police, especially on people of color. Sandhya Dirks /KQED hide caption

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Sandhya Dirks /KQED

Oakland Church Steps Out On Faith And Pledges To Stop Calling Police

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LAPD Deputy Chief Dennis Kato tracks crime statistics in near real time and searches across databases using new, more powerful analytics tools. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

How Data Analysis Is Driving Policing

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Employees at the Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System in Montgomery, Ala., say they face retaliation when reporting mismanagement or abuse. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

For VA Whistleblowers, A Culture Of Fear And Retaliation

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In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the death of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and in solidarity with the family and supporters of Stephon Clark and others killed by police, demonstrators protest and march in the Magnificent Mile shopping district on April 2, 2018 in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago Debates If Civilian Groups Should Oversee Police

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In this video, Amazon's Ranju Das demonstrates real-time facial recognition to an audience. It shows video from a traffic cam that he said was provided by the city of Orlando, where police have been trying the technology out. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando Police Testing Amazon's Real-Time Facial Recognition

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NEC Corporation of America already supplies many American jurisdictions with still photo facial recognition. Now the company says it's getting law enforcement inquiries about its real-time facial recognition. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Real-Time Facial Recognition Is Available, But Will U.S. Police Buy It?

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Dr. Bennet Omalu, shown here in New York City on Dec. 16, 2015, is a pathologist best known for researching NFL brain injuries. On Dec. 5, 2017, Omalu resigned from the San Joaquin County coroner's office accusing Sheriff-Coroner Steve Moore of interfering with death investigations to protect law enforcement officers. Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

In California, Critics Say Sheriff-Coroner Gig Is A Conflict Of Interest

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