Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters. This team covers the nation's criminal justice system, including challenges to justice equity; recidivism; juvenile justice; prisons; police-community relations; crime-fighting strategies and trends including surveillance tools and technology.
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Criminal Justice Collaborative

Original reporting on the nation's criminal justice system from NPR and member station reporters.

After the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., news organizations started to keep their own tallies of deaths, which turned out to be higher than the government's numbers. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Jennifer Longdon and her fiancé were getting tacos when both were shot by an unknown assailant. Today she's an Arizona state lawmaker. Gun violence prevention and disability rights are her top priorities. Michael Ging hide caption

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Michael Ging

After 25 Years In The Dark, The CDC Wants To Study The True Toll Of Guns In America

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A demonstrator holds her hands up while she kneels in front of the Police at the Anaheim City Hall on June 1, 2020 in Anaheim, California. Reform pressures have many cops leaving the job. APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

Violent Crime Has Stayed High — Whether Police Are The Answer Is Up For Debate

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Critics say American officers should be trained in defensive tactics, especially empty-hand techniques, so that they depend less on tasers and guns. Images by Steve Skinner Photogra/Getty Images hide caption

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Images by Steve Skinner Photogra/Getty Images

American Cops Are Under Pressure To Rely Less On Guns And Take More Personal Risk

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Oakland City Vice Mayor and Councilmember Rebecca Kaplan says sending police to mental health and behavioral calls they aren't trained for is a mistake cities keep repeating. Philip Pacheco/ AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Pacheco/ AFP via Getty Images

Oakland Becomes Latest City Looking To Take Police Out Of Some Nonviolent 911 Calls

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This image from video shows Minneapolis police officers Thomas Lane, left, and J. Alexander Kueng, right, escorting George Floyd, center, to a police vehicle outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis, on May 25, 2020. The image was shown as prosecutor Steve Schleicher gave closing arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the death of Floyd. AP hide caption

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AP

How Using Videos At Chauvin Trial And Others Impacts Criminal Justice

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Police officer David Moore is pictured wearing a body camera in Ipswich, Mass., on Dec. 1, 2020. The city was among 25 statewide awarded grants to purchase body-worn cameras for videotaping interactions with the public. A new study says the benefits to society and police departments outweigh the costs of the cameras. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A sign points toward the women's section of the Huntington Beach jail. The National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls is appealing to President Biden to grant clemency to 100 women during his first 100 days in office. Jeff Gritchen/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Gritchen/Orange County Register via Getty Images

#FreeHer Campaign Wants Clemency For 100 Women In Biden's First 100 Days

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In April 2020, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee did not list gun stores as essential businesses that could stay open during his Stay-at-Home order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. However, some retail gun shops followed orders by then-President Trump and state Republicans who advised that the firearms industry could remain open. There was an uptick in gun and ammo sales. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

In early December last year, a video captured part of a shootout and attempted carjacking. A retired firefighter died. Chicago police say one of the four suspects was 15 years old. Chicago Police Department/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Chicago Police Department/screenshot by NPR

Juveniles Part Of A Huge Increase In Carjackings Across The Country

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The IRS distributed the second round of stimulus money to eligible inmates using debit cards, which state prisons are unable to process. Correctional officials have communicated the problem to the federal agency, but it's unclear what steps the IRS will take to fix it. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

In this Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021 file photo, Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier at the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

After The Capitol Attack, Does Police MAGA Sentiment Cross The Line?

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