Deceptive Cadence Deceptive Cadence un-stuffs the world of classical music, which is both fusty and ferociously alive.

Deceptive Cadence

From NPR Classical

The 1808 Érard piano that Napoleon gifted to his second wife, Marie-Louise, is on long-term loan from the Museum of Music History to the Cobbe Collection of historic instruments outside London. Museum of Music History hide caption

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Museum of Music History

Napoleon's piano lends authenticity to Ridley Scott's biopic

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A scene from Florencia en el Amazonas. Ken Howard/Met Opera hide caption

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Ken Howard/Met Opera

Finding a place at the Met, this opera sings in a language of its own

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The new album of music by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt is a warm blanket of comfort in troubled times. Luciano Rossetti/ECM Records hide caption

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Luciano Rossetti/ECM Records

A disciplined plea for peace – and quiet – from composer Arvo Pärt

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Polish countertenor Jakub Józef Orliński also breakdances, two skills showcased in Semele at Munich's Bavarian State Opera this year before it heads to New York's Metropolitan Opera next season. Monika Rittershaus/Bavarian State Opera hide caption

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Monika Rittershaus/Bavarian State Opera

From opera to breakdancing and back again: Jakub Józef Orliński fuses two worlds

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STILLPOINT is the first album in 12 years from pianist Awadagin Pratt. Rob Davidson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Rob Davidson/Courtesy of the artist

After 12 years, pianist Awadagin Pratt rediscovers his sweet spot

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The Philip Glass Ensemble performing Music in Twelve Parts at the Idea Warehouse in 1975, with vocalist Joan La Barbara (far left). The Museum of Modern Art/SCALA/Art Resource, N.Y. hide caption

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The Museum of Modern Art/SCALA/Art Resource, N.Y.

Minimalism: a story told in 8 pulses

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Composer Ted Hearne's new choral work, FARMING, takes its texts from Jeff Bezos and William Penn to explore connections between farming, colonialism and capitalism. Peter English/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Peter English/Courtesy of the artist

Ted Hearne's choral work 'FARMING' raises food for thought

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Soprano Jessye Norman left a number of recordings in the vault at the time of her death. Now some of them have been released for the first time. Decca Archives hide caption

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Decca Archives

The voice of Jessye Norman soars again in trove of unreleased recordings

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Missy Mazzoli's new album, Dark with Excessive Bright, features the composer's orchestral compositions. Caroline Tompkins/courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Caroline Tompkins/courtesy of the artist

Missy Mazzoli is a symphonic composer with a photographer's eye

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Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads the Philadelphia Orchestra at Carnegie Hall on Oct. 6, 2021. Last week, the mayor of Philadelphia declared it "Philly Loves Yannick Week," in celebration of him extending his contract with the Philadelphia Orchestra for four more years. Chris Lee/Philadelphia Orchestra hide caption

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Chris Lee/Philadelphia Orchestra

From Beyoncé to Debussy, Yannick Nézet-Séguin shares music that inspires him

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Gustavo Dudamel conducts the New York Philharmonic, March 9, 2022. Chris Lee/New York Philharmonic hide caption

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Chris Lee/New York Philharmonic

N.Y. Philharmonic chief looks to Gustavo 'Dudamel era' after historic appointment

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Trade, created by Emma O'Halloran and Mark O'Halloran, will be featured at the PROTOTYPE festival this year. Maria Baranova/Unison Media hide caption

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Maria Baranova/Unison Media

Who says opera needs a grand stage? This festival is all about intimate productions

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A photo of Lionel Mapleson, pasted in one of his journals. Alex Teplitzky/NYPL hide caption

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Alex Teplitzky/NYPL

This man's recordings spent years under a recliner — they've now found a new home

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Angelo Badalamenti in a portrait taken Feb. 9, 1990. The composer, best known for his work with director David Lynch, died Dec. 11, 2022. ABC Photo Archives/Disney General Entertainment Content via Getty Images hide caption

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ABC Photo Archives/Disney General Entertainment Content via Getty Images

An exterior shot of The Juilliard School in New York City, taken in September 2020. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

A 2005 exterior shot of The Juilliard School, which is located on the campus of Lincoln Center in New York City. Stan Honda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP via Getty Images

The classical singer Julia Bullock has released Walking in the Dark, her debut solo album. Grant Legan/Nonesuch Records hide caption

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Grant Legan/Nonesuch Records

With a bold debut album, Julia Bullock curates an unconventional career

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Julia Bullock's Walking in the Dark is one of NPR Music's top 10 classical albums of 2022. Photo illustration: Jackie Lay/NPR / Photo: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration: Jackie Lay/NPR / Photo: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Composer Ned Rorem in 1953 in Paris, where he lived for nearly a decade and wrote his infamous Paris Diary. Provided by the artist hide caption

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Provided by the artist

Composer Julia Wolfe at the Nashville Symphony Orchestra's world premiere of her piece Her Story on Sept. 15, 2022. Kurt Heinecke/Nashville Symphony hide caption

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Kurt Heinecke/Nashville Symphony

Our biggest orchestras are finally playing more music by women. What took so long?

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