Deceptive Cadence Deceptive Cadence un-stuffs the world of classical music, which is both fusty and ferociously alive.

Deceptive Cadence

From NPR Classical

UC Berkeley Professor Richard Taruskin, whose 4000-page book The Oxford History of Western Music set a benchmark for writing about the history of classical music. San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst N/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty hide caption

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San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst N/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty

"That's where our story starts, but that's not where music starts."

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Vijay Gupta performing with some of the professional musicians in Street Symphony at the Midnight Mission on LA's Skid Row. David Zimmerman hide caption

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David Zimmerman

Street Symphony plays in harmony with Skid Row's 'sacred spaces'

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Composer Carlos Simon's Requiem for the Enslaved, commissioned by Georgetown University, is a reckoning with the school's troubled history. Toko Shiik/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Toko Shiik/Courtesy of the artist

'Requiem for the Enslaved' holds a major university's truths up to the light

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Herman Makarenko, lead conductor for the National Opera of Ukraine. Julian Hayda/NPR hide caption

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Julian Hayda/NPR

Kyiv opera house reopens after 3 months

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Cellist Yo-Yo Ma, left, with composer John Williams, right. The pair recently released a collaborative recording, A Gathering of Friends, with the New York Philharmonic. Lawrence Sumulong/Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Lawrence Sumulong/Courtesy of Sony Music

Composer John Williams and cellist Yo-Yo Ma bring together 'A Gathering of Friends'

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Third Coast Percussion's new album, Perspectives, is the group's most accessible. Saverio Truglia/Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Saverio Truglia/Courtesy of the artists

Third Coast Percussion's borderless music finds inspiration in fleet-footed beats

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Raven Chacon's Voiceless Mass has won the Pulitzer Prize for music. Adam Conte/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Adam Conte/Courtesy of the artist

English composer Harrison Birtwistle, seen in 2002, has died, his publisher confirmed on Monday. Hanya Chlala/ArenaPAL /Boosey & Hawkes hide caption

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Hanya Chlala/ArenaPAL /Boosey & Hawkes

A March 24 dress rehearsal for "A Knee on the Neck." Front, from left: Mezzo-soprano J'Nai Bridges, National Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorale Music Director Piotr Gajewski, tenor Norman Shankle and baritone Kenneth Overton. Behind: The National Philharmonic Orchestra and Chorale, joined by members of The Washington Chorus and The Howard University Chorale. Elman Studio/Courtesy of the National Philharmonic hide caption

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Elman Studio/Courtesy of the National Philharmonic

George Floyd remembered in new choral work

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Composer, Mary D. Watkins, left, and librettist, Clare Coss, right, pose for a portrait at Ripley-Grier Rehearsals in New York, NY on March 17, 2022. Nate Palmer hide caption

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Nate Palmer

Critics want to shutter a new opera about Emmett Till. Here's what its creators say

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Pianist Ruth Slenczynska, photographed in 2021. At 97, she just released her first record for the Decca label in nearly 60 years. Meredith Truax/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Meredith Truax/Courtesy of the artist

At 97, Pianist Ruth Slenczynska has a new album — and plenty of stories

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Semyon Bychkov, conducting the Vienna Philharmonic in Vienna, Austria in 2017. Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images

As performing artists denounce or stay allied with Putin, history offers some lessons

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A still from "We Hold These Truths." Music for the new opera was composed by Tamar-kali, and director dream hampton put that music to film, for the LA Opera's Digital Shorts series. Erik Paul Howard hide caption

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Erik Paul Howard

New opera teaches a classical music class in the ongoing fight for civil rights

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Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas prepares backstage prior to performing with the YouTube Symphony Orchestra at Sydney Opera House in 2011 in Sydney, Australia. Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato's new album, Eden, is a meditation on the natural world. Sergi Jasanada/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sergi Jasanada/Courtesy of the artist

Joyce DiDonato's 'Eden' beckons humanity back to the garden

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Star Russian soprano Anna Netrekbo singing in Metz, France in February 2020. Christoph de Barry/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Christoph de Barry/AFP via Getty Images

Conductor Valery Gergiev, pictured in 2017, has pulled out of a concert series at Carnegie Hall that was scheduled for this weekend. Maxim Shipenkov/AP hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AP

Composer, conductor and multi-instrumentalist Tyshawn Sorey leads a rehearsal of his Monochromatic Light (Afterlife) at the Rothko Chapel in Houston on Feb. 18. Scott Dalton/DACAMERA hide caption

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Scott Dalton/DACAMERA

At the Rothko Chapel, Tyshawn Sorey explores sound — and silence

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Tenor Curtis Bannister sings the role of Stan in Beethoven's Fidelio, in a dress rehearsal. Russ Rowland/Courtesy of Heartbeat Opera hide caption

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Russ Rowland/Courtesy of Heartbeat Opera

Prison choirs sing in a reboot of Beethoven's opera about unjust incarceration

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A 1968 portrait of George Crumb. Gabriel Hackett/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Hackett/Getty Images

George Crumb, an influential and deeply American composer, has died at age 92

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