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Kanye West at a laptop during his Yeezy Season 3 fashion show and album debut at Madison Square Garden in New York Feb. 11. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

Is Tidal Changing How Fans Talk About Music?

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Kanye West's 'The Life Of Pablo' Sparks Rampant Piracy

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Nancy Jo Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls about their social media and Internet habits while researching her book American Girls. Knopf hide caption

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Knopf

Teen Girls And Social Media: A Story Of 'Secret Lives' And Misogyny

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'Body Hacking' Movement Rises Ahead Of Moral Answers

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Jack Gibson is one of several disc jockeys and other stars of early black radio who is featured in the Google Cultural Archive. Indiana University's Archives of African American Music and Culture hide caption

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Indiana University's Archives of African American Music and Culture

Archive Spotlights The "Golden Age" Of Black Radio

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Julie Zhuo, product design director at Facebook, demonstrates the new emoji-like stickers users can press in addition to the like button. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

When You Want To Express Empathy, Skip The Emoji

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New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

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Privacy is one of a number of issues Apple CEO Tim Cook has called morally important. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Apple's CEO Takes A Stand — And A Risk

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Commentary: Siri, Say What? A Southern Writer's Struggle With Dictation Apps

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The official seal of the Federal Bureau of Investigation is seen on an iPhone's camera screen outside the J. Edgar Hoover headquarters in Washington, D.C. Apple is facing off with the FBI in court over investigators' request that the tech giant help them circumvent the iPhone's security features. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Apple CEO Tim Cook says creating new software to break into a locked iPhone would be "bad news" and "we would never write it." He spoke with ABC News' World News Tonight with David Muir. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Apple CEO Tim Cook: Backdoor To iPhones Would Be Software Equivalent Of Cancer

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This smartphone case talks to an app that can turn it into a stun gun. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

At Tech Conference, Meet The Tesla Of Bikes And A Weaponized Phone

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