On Disabilities On Disabilities

Gloria Single and her husband Bill Single in the dining hall of the skilled nursing floor at Pioneer House nursing home in Sacramento. AARP Foundation attorneys say California needs to more tightly enforce laws that prohibit evictions of the sort that separated the Singles, and sped up her physical decline. Aubrey Jones hide caption

toggle caption
Aubrey Jones

AARP Foundation Sues Nursing Home To Stop Illegal Evictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563710785/563894885" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The post-fire entryway of the Anova school, which was located in Santa Rosa's Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Adam Grossberg/KQED

If you are suddenly unable to work for an extended period because of illness, injury or accident, long-term-disability insurance can save the day. Rich LaSalle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rich LaSalle/Getty Images

Kerri De Nies plays with her son, Gregory Mac Phee at their home in San Diego. Gregory tested positive for adrenoleukodystrophy, a rare brain disorder that affects 1 in about 18,000 babies. Roughly 30 percent of boys with the genetic mutation go on to develop the most serious form of the disease. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Gorman/KHN

Parents Lobby States To Expand Newborn Screening Test For Rare Brain Disorder

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555091418/555710522" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sara Wong for NPR

For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn't Better

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554369327/554994460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Blend Images/Getty Images

Sens. Lindsey Graham (from left), Bill Cassidy and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell take questions during a press conference Tuesday. Graham and Cassidy were among the co-sponsors of a proposal to overhaul the Affordable Care Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Piper Su, seen here with her son, Elliot, lives in Alexandria, Va. She has registered with several transplant centers in hopes of increasing the odds of getting an organ. Courtesy of Piper Su hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Piper Su

Searching For A Fairer Way To Distribute Donor Livers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/549224583/553662037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., continues to tweak the health care bill he cosponsors in an effort to persuade reluctant senators to back it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Two-year-old Robbie Klein of West Roxbury, Mass., has hemophilia, a medical condition that interferes with his blood's ability to clot normally. His parents, both teachers, worry that his condition could make it hard for them to get insurance to cover his expensive medications if the law changes. Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/Jesse Costa/WBUR

Charlene Yurgaitis gets health insurance through Medicaid in Pennsylvania. It covers the counseling and medication she and her doctors say she needs to recover from her opioid addiction. Ben Allen/WITF hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Allen/WITF

Protesters rally against Medicaid cuts in front of the U.S. Capitol in June. Medicaid is the nation's largest health insurance program, covering 74 million people — more than 1 in 5 Americans. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images

Sen. Lindsey Graham, second from left, speaks as Sen. John Barrasso, from left, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. John Thune and Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell listen during a news briefing Tuesday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Affordable Care Act navigators helped guide those looking for insurance during an enrollment event at San Antonio's Southwest General Hospital last year. Beyond helping with initial enrollment, navigators often follow up with help later, as an applicant's income or job status changes. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Nursing homes are required to have emergency plans and have staff practice evacuations, but many fail to meet even those basic requirements. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Firefighters work beneath the vertical struts of the World Trade Center's twin towers, in Lower Manhattan, following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Mark Lennihan/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/Associated Press

Sept. 11 First Responder Fights On Behalf Of Others Who Rushed To Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550094607/550204066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Residents of the community of Tujunga, Calif., flee a fire near Burbank on Sept. 2. Even people much farther from the flames are feeling health effects from acrid smoke. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

Is All That Wildfire Smoke Damaging My Lungs?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/549165837/550058423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lily Padula for NPR

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/547580952/548415579" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript