On Disabilities On Disabilities

On Disabilities

Georgia Linders got sick with COVID in the spring of 2020 and never recovered. Her ongoing battle with long COVID has prevented her from working. She spends her days advocating for COVID longhaulers like herself and painting, one of the few activities that doesn't wear her out. Georgia Linders hide caption

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Georgia Linders

Millions of Americans have long COVID. Many of them are no longer working

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Judy Heumann, center wheelchair, is given an ovation at the swearing in as U.S. Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Service in Berkeley, California Tuesday, June 29, 1993. Judge Gail Bereola, left, did the swearing in, with Berkeley Mayor Loni Hancock, standing left and sign language interpreter Joseph Quinn and Julie Weissman, right, in attendance with a large audience. Susan Ragan/AP hide caption

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Susan Ragan/AP

Lucille Brooks, a retiree who lives in Pittsford, New York, was sued in 2020 for nearly $8,000 by a nursing home that had taken care of her brother. The nursing home dropped the case after she showed she had no control over his money or authority to make decisions for him. Heather Ainsworth for KHN hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth for KHN

Nursing homes are suing friends and family to collect on patients' bills

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A selfie of Beth Kenny (foreground), their wife Adina (middle), and their child Vyla sitting in their backyard in Alameda, Calif. Since the lifting of COVID safety measures, Kenny and their family have had to pull back from indoor activities, and they struggle to explain why to Vyla. Beth Kenny hide caption

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Beth Kenny

Jon Miller sits in his bedroom with his dog, Carlos, whom he received as a present for successfully completing cancer treatment a decade ago. Miller sustained severe brain damage, and requires the help of home health aides to continue living in his home. Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media

Heather Carll returned to teaching special education after Hawaii began offering special educators $10,000 more a year. She teaches at Momilani Elementary School in Pearl City. Marie Eriel Hobro for NPR hide caption

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Marie Eriel Hobro for NPR

Schools are struggling to hire special education teachers. Hawaii may have found a fix

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Delphine Lee/NPR

Students with disabilities have a right to qualified teachers — but there's a shortage

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Masking is a common coping mechanism employed by autistic people in an attempt to fit into a neurotypical society. Examples of masking include forcing oneself to smile at the "appropriate" times, looking between someone's eyebrows instead of making uncomfortable eye contact, and suppressing stims like hand flapping, even though they're comforting. Megan Rhiannon for NPR hide caption

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Megan Rhiannon for NPR
Callie Giovanna/TED

Yvonne van Amerongen: How can we reimagine elder care around human connection?

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Staci Cowan has been a certified recovery mentor at Bridges to Change for the past three years, most recently working at its drop-in center called Club Hope. Celeste Noche for NPR hide caption

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Celeste Noche for NPR

Oregon has funding for addiction recovery programs, but not enough employees

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Lara and Trey Garey stand at the bedside of Tom Garey, an Air Force veteran with advanced ALS. Trey, 19, has spent much of his teenage years caring for his father at their Texas home. Carson Frame/American Homefront hide caption

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Carson Frame/American Homefront
Penguin Random House / Thomas Insel

The American Rescue Plan Act that President Biden signed into law increased funding to Medicaid, but delays and red tape have kept several states from claiming much of the cash almost a year later. Doug Mills/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Getty Images

Charis Hill, Johnnie Jae and Cass Condray all have conditions that compromise their immune systems and put them at higher risk for severe COVID-19 infection. Brian Baker; Johnnie Jae; Greg Condray hide caption

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Brian Baker; Johnnie Jae; Greg Condray

As Masks Come Off, Immunocompromised Americans Feel Left Behind

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Nurse's aide Patricia Johnson has worked for the Ambassador Nursing and Rehabilitation Center on the north side of Chicago for nearly 24 years. The pandemic has been grueling on her and her colleagues. "The hardest part is watching people die alone without their families," says Johnson, who now sometimes works double shifts due to staff shortages. Jennifer Swanson/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Swanson/NPR

The pandemic pummeled long-term care – it may not recover quickly, experts warn

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Dr. Mai Pham is an internist and former senior Medicare and Medicaid official with degrees from Harvard and Johns Hopkins universities, but she still struggled to find care for her son with autism, Alex Roodman. Alyssa Schukar for KHN hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for KHN

Kids with autism struggle to adapt to adulthood. One doctor is trying to change that

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Gene Cox speaks with Brenda Konkel, president of Occupy Madison and executive director of Madison Area Care for the Homeless OneHealth. Occupy Madison provides tiny houses for people experiencing homelessness in Madison, Wisconsin. Giles Bruce for KHN hide caption

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Giles Bruce for KHN

Brothers Chase Miller (left), 10, and Carson Miller, 11, in November 2021. The two brothers have a rare genetic disorder and are immunocompromised. Their family has to practice extreme caution to prevent coronavirus exposures. Danny Miller hide caption

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Danny Miller

There's one population that gets overlooked by an 'everyone will get COVID' mentality

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