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Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

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Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Co-founder Mark Burke signs with patrons at Streetcar 82 Brewing Co., in Hyattsville, Md. "My goal is to make the best beer," Burke said. "But the impact and magnitude of how this influences the Deaf community is inspiring." Madeleine Cook/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook/NPR

Amanda Koller is deaf and has struggled to find full-time permanent employment, an issue she attributes to discrimination in the hiring process against those with disabilities. Madeleine Cook/NPR hide caption

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Madeleine Cook/NPR

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a speech Thursday to the new Congress that Democrats want "to lower health care costs and prescription drug prices and protect people with pre-existing medical conditions." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Democrats' Health Care Ambitions Meet The Reality Of Divided Government

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Is It A Nasty Cold Or The Flu?

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Though his politics are right of center and he lobbied hard against the Affordable Care Act, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch also has been key to passing several landmark health laws with bipartisan support. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

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Charlotte Potts, who has a history of heart problems, lives within sight of Livingston Regional Hospital. After a recent stint there, she was discharged into the care of a home health agency, and now gets treatment in her apartment for some ailments. Shalina Chatlania / WPLN hide caption

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Shalina Chatlania / WPLN

How Helping Patients Get Good Care At Home Helps Rural Hospitals Survive

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Philadelphia demonstrators protested earlier moves by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act last February. If the ACA is indeed axed as unconstitutional, health policy analysts say, millions of people could lose health coverage, and many aspects of Medicare and Medicaid would change dramatically. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

In 2015, demonstrators in Washington, D.C., urged Supreme Court justices to save the Affordable Care Act from a legal challenge. The federal health law survived, but last week U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor ruled it invalid. An appeal of his controversial decision is underway. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Judge Who Invalidated Obamacare Has Been A 'Go-To Judge' For Republicans, Critics Say

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Seven-year-old Carson Miller (left), and his brother, 5-year-old Chase Miller (right), both have a degenerative brain disease called MEPAN syndrome. There are only 13 people in the world who have it. Courtesy of Andrew Ross-Perry hide caption

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Courtesy of Andrew Ross-Perry

Medical Detectives: The Last Hope For Families Coping With Rare Diseases

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People who earn up to 400 percent of the poverty level (about $48,500 for an individual and $100,400 for a family of four in 2019) are eligible for subsidies of the cost of their marketplace health plans. But many of the 5 million who aren't eligible feel crushed by rising costs. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

The deadline for signing up for individual health insurance coverage on HealthCare.gov ends Saturday, Dec. 15. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

Affordable Care Act Insurance Sign-Ups Fall Slightly For 2019

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Medicare's new program will alter a year's worth of payments to 14,959 skilled nursing facilities across the U.S., based on how often in the past fiscal year their residents ended up back in hospitals within 30 days of leaving. BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Getty Images

The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

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Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Affordable Care Act navigator Nini Hadwen (right) helped Jorge Hernandez (left) and Marta Aguirre find a plan on the health insurance exchange in Miami in 2013. Today, with fewer navigators, much of that counseling is done by phone instead of in person. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Helping a spouse or parent who has dementia steer clear of hazards can include ridding the home of all guns. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Firearms And Dementia: How Do You Convince A Loved One To Give Up Their Guns?

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Open enrollment for 2019 health plans begins Nov. 1 on HealthCare.gov and on most state insurance exchanges. Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Healthcare.gov via Screenshot by NPR

Looking For ACA Health Insurance For 2019? Here's What To Expect

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