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On Disabilities

On the advice of a co-worker, Dehne joined a six-week program through which she learned how to safely walk to ease her pain. Now Dehne briskly walks for exercise and enjoyment multiple times a week. Her knees, she says, "don't hurt me anymore." Eamon Queeney for NPR hide caption

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Eamon Queeney for NPR

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help

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UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access. KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

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President Trump talked about expanding health coverage options for small businesses in a Rose Garden gathering at the White House in June. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has written a children's book called Just Ask! inspired by her desire to help kids embrace diversity. "If you don't know why someone's doing something, just ask them," she says. "Don't assume the worst in people." Rafael López/Philomel Books hide caption

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Rafael López/Philomel Books

'Just Ask!' Says Sonia Sotomayor. She Knows What It's Like To Feel Different

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According to the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll exercise, including stretching and yoga, is popular among younger people as a way to relieve pain. Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

A Harvard research team's prototype of a portable exosuit is made of cloth components worn at the waist and thighs. A computer that's built into the shorts uses an algorithm that can sense when the user shifts between a walking gait and a running gait. Wyss Institute at Harvard University hide caption

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Wyss Institute at Harvard University

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

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Disability activists from around the world attended a seminar in Oregon. From left, Joyce Peter of Vanuatu, Sidonie Nduwimana of Burundi,, Wendy Beatriz Caishpal Jaco of El Salvador, Gina Rose Balanlay of the Philippines (standing) and Raluca Oancea of Romania. Aparna Vidyasagar for NPR hide caption

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Aparna Vidyasagar for NPR

At Nashville's "High Five" camp, 12-year-old Priceless Garinger (center), whose right side has been weakened by cerebral palsy, wears a full-length, bright pink cast on her left arm — though that arm's strong and healthy. By using her weaker right arm and hand to decorate a cape, she hopes to gain a stronger grip and fine motor control. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

At 'High Five' Camp, Struggling With A Disability Is The Point

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A large new "sensory space" at Pittsburgh International Airport is divided into separate rooms; families can tailor sound and light levels to each traveler, whatever their age. Courtesy of Pittsburgh International Airport hide caption

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Courtesy of Pittsburgh International Airport

Kids And Adults With Autism Flying Easier In Pittsburgh, With Airport's Help

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Robyn Adcock (left), a University of California, San Francisco pain relief specialist, gently guides Jessica Greenfield to acupressure points on her son's foot and leg that have helped relieve his chronic pain. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times

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Sovereign Valentine, a personal trainer in Plains, Mont., needs dialysis for his end-stage renal disease. When he first started dialysis treatments, Fresenius Kidney Care clinic in Missoula charged $13,867.74 per session, or about 59 times the $235 Medicare pays for a dialysis session. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

University of Utah doctoral student Jacob George, left, and associate professor Greg Clark examine the LUKE arm that they use for their experiments. A man who lost his lower arm in an electrical accident was able to experience some sense of touch and fine motor control with his grip while using the experimental device. Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering hide caption

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Dan Hixson/University of Utah College of Engineering

Medicare Advantage plans, administered by private insurance companies under contract with Medicare, treat more than 22 million seniors — more than 1 in 3 people on Medicare. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Demonstrators rallied in Sacramento in May for Medi-Cal expansion to undocumented Californians. When the state's budget was finalized, only young adults up to age 26 were authorized to be included in the expansion. Gov. Gavin Newsom says that's an important first step. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Young Undocumented Californians Cheer Promise Of Health Benefits

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Demonstrators from Doctors for America marched in support of the Affordable Care Act outside the U.S. Supreme Court in March 2015. Now, another case aims to undo the federal health law: Texas v. United States could land in front of the Supreme Court ahead of the 2020 election. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From 2012 through 2016, federal health inspectors cited 87% of U.S. hospices for deficiencies. And 20% had lapses serious enough to endanger patients, according to two new reports from the HHS Inspector General's Office. sturti/Getty Images hide caption

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sturti/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General Finds Serious Flaws In 20% Of U.S. Hospice Programs

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Marchers at a candlelight vigil in San Francisco, Calif., carry a banner to call attention to the continuing battle against AIDS on May 29, 1989. The city was home to the nation's first AIDS special care unit. The unit, which opened in 1983, is the subject the documentary 5B. Jason M. Grow/AP hide caption

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Jason M. Grow/AP

1st AIDS Ward '5B' Fought To Give Patients Compassionate Care, Dignified Deaths

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In many rural areas, helicopters are the only speedy way to get patients to a trauma center or hospital burn unit. As more than 100 rural hospitals have closed around the U.S. since 2010, the need for air transport has only increased. Ollo/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollo/Getty Images

Bonnielin Swenor, an assistant professor of ophthalmology, has myopic macular degeneration. It hasn't stopped her from having a prolific career as a researcher and epidemiologist. But until recently, she rarely discussed her disability with her peers, worried they would judge or dismiss her. Christopher Myers hide caption

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Christopher Myers
Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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