On Disabilities On Disabilities

On Disabilities

A decontamination crew from the Environmental Protection Agency works on extracting asbestos fibers from a barn in the Libby area. The EPA has cleaned thousands of homes, buildings, and public spaces in the most expensive environmental clean up in American history. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

COVID-19 Stalks A Montana Town Already Grappling With Asbestos Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914064239/922761644" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman recovering from fever linked to COVID-19 checks medications in her home in Mineola, N.Y., this spring. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Nearly Two-Thirds Of U.S. Households Struck By COVID-19 Face Financial Trouble

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/916605221/917683821" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

toggle caption
Nguyễn Văn Hốt

Demonstrators pray in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on July 8, a day the court ruled that employers with religious objections can decline to provide contraception coverage under the Affordable Care Act. With the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the ACA's future is in doubt. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Future Of The Affordable Care Act In A Supreme Court Without Ginsburg

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/915000375/915171239" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers with disabilities can be paid less than minimum wage. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says that has trapped workers in "exploitative and discriminatory" job programs. erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images

Workers With Disabilities Can Earn Just $3.34 An Hour. Agency Says Law Needs Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/912840482/913900457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patients with a fast-progressing form of ALS who got daily doses of an experimental two-drug combination called AMX0035 scored higher on a standard measure of function than patients who didn't get the drug. Zephyr/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Zephyr/Science Source

Drug Combination Slows Progression Of ALS And Could Mark 'New Era' In Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908874110/908874111" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

José spent three months in the hospital being treated for COVID-19. "All of the nurses clapped for me as I was leaving the hospital," he says. But now he faces a long recovery at home. Eddie Quiñones for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eddie Quiñones for NPR

Undocumented With COVID-19: Many Face A Long Recovery, Largely On Their Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/905822094/908306108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A COVID-19 patient in the intensive care unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on July 28. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Go Nakamura/Getty Images

When the pandemic hit this spring, U.S. rural hospitals lost an estimated 70% of their income as patients avoided the emergency room, doctor's appointments and elective surgeries. "It was devastating," says Maggie Elehwany of the National Rural Health Association. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A drop-off at a day care last month in the Queens borough of New York City. Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsey Nicholson/Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Dr. Deborah Birx speaks to reporters this week outside the Arkansas Governor's Mansion in Little Rock. Birx indicated that data on U.S. COVID-19 hospitalizations will move back to the CDC under a "revolutionary new data system" the agency is developing. Andrew DeMillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew DeMillo/AP

Actors Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver in a scene from Marriage Story. The award-winning 2019 film can be watched with audio description that conveys scenes to viewers who are visually impaired. But Parasite, another popular award-winner, has not included such descriptions. Wilson Webb/Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Wilson Webb/Netflix

There's A Better Way To 'Dub' Movie Audio For Visually Impaired Fans

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903532511/903569467" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Some Netflix users will be able to watch shows at slower and faster speeds. It's a helpful move for blind and deaf users, advocates say. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Netflix Is Letting Some People Speed Up Playback. That's A Big Deal For Blind Fans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/901317290/901330885" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Melissa Hickson says no one asked her husband, Michael, shown here with stepdaughter Mia, if he wanted to keep getting treatment. "He would say: 'I want to live. I love my family and my children ... that's the reason for the three years I have fought to survive,'" she says. Melissa Hickson hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Hickson

One Man's COVID-19 Death Raises The Worst Fears Of Many People With Disabilities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896882268/900081959" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Voters in Kirkwood, Mo., cast ballots on Nov. 6, 2018 that helped decide the balance of power in Congress. Next week they'll get the chance to decide whether to expand Medicaid in their state. The measure could extend health coverage to more than 230,000 more Missourians. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Blood plasma — the yellowish, cell-free portion that remains after red and white blood cells have been filtered out by a machine and returned to the plasma donor — is rich with antibodies. Plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients might prove useful in preventing infection as well as in treatment, scientists say. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

Harvested Antibodies Now Being Tested As A Prevention Tool Against COVID-19

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/895996309/895999216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Michael Conley, who is deaf, models a mask that has a transparent panel in San Diego on June 3. Face coverings can make communication harder for people who rely on reading lips, and that has spurred a slew of startups and volunteers to make masks with plastic windows. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Demand Surges For See-Through Face Masks As Pandemic Swells

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/893071631/895715006" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Conner Curran, 9, (right) and his brother Will, 7, at their home in Ridgefield, Conn., this week. The gene therapy treatment that stopped the muscle wasting of Conner's muscular dystrophy two years ago took more than 30 years of research to develop. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kholood Eid for NPR

An evacuee lies on a cot at an evacuation shelter for people with disabilities in Stuart, Fla., in preparation for Hurricane Dorian on Sept. 1, 2019. Now, with the pandemic raging, officials across the South are trying to adjust their evacuation and shelter plans. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Disaster Relief For The Elderly And Disabled Is Already Hard. Now Add A Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/894148776/894343604" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amber England, who led the successful campaign for a ballot initiative to give 200,000 more Oklahomans health coverage, talked with supporters online this week. Voters narrowly approved the Medicaid expansion measure Tuesday, despite opposition by the state's governor and legislature. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sue Ogrocki/AP

Matt Ford is seen in Verona, Wis., with one of his caregivers, Grace Brunette. An accident in 1987 left Ford paralyzed in all four limbs. He needs help getting in and out of bed, preparing meals, using the bathroom and driving. Brunette recently finished a physician assistant program at the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Matt Ford hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Ford

Kelly Womochil, an aide at Enterprise Estates Nursing Center in Enterprise, Kan., tries on a poncho that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending to nursing homes to protect against the coronavirus. Pamela Black hide caption

toggle caption
Pamela Black