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Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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Various types of pufferfish are among those served as the gastronomic delicacy fugu. The paralyzing nerve toxin some of these fish contain is also under study by brain scientists hunting new ways to treat amblyopia. shan.shihan/Getty Images hide caption

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Pufferfish Toxin Holds Clues To Treating 'Lazy Eye' In Adults

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Weeks after getting sick from COVID-19, Kathleen Hipps is still experiencing symptoms, even though she was fully vaccinated. Kathleen Hipps hide caption

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Kathleen Hipps

What We Know About Breakthrough Infections And Long COVID

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ECMO is the highest level of life support — beyond a ventilator, which pumps oxygen via a tube through the windpipe into the lungs. Instead, the ECMO process basically functions as a heart and lungs outside of the body — routing the blood via tubing to a machine that oxygenates it, then pumps it back into the patient. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

Across The COVID-Ravaged South, High-Level Life Support Is Difficult To Find

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Attorney Marc Scanlon meets with client Kimberly Ledezma at Salud Family Health Centers' clinic in Commerce City, Colo. Every day in this Denver suburb, four lawyers join the clinic's physicians, psychiatrists and social workers to consult on cases, as part of the clinic's philosophy that mending legal ills is as important for health as diet and exercise. Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News

In the 1970s, Vernice Davis Anthony was one of dozens of Detroit public health nurses who regularly fanned out throughout the city, building trust. They visited the home of every new mom and worked in schools, tracking cases of infectious diseases and making sure kids got immunized. Nic Antaya/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Nic Antaya/Kaiser Health News

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, who has helped the U.S. through other crises like the Zika outbreak, is now taking on health misinformation around COVID-19, which he says continues to jeopardize the country's efforts to beat back the virus. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The U.S. Surgeon General Is Calling COVID-19 Misinformation An 'Urgent Threat'

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Health conditions exacerbated by obesity include heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, according to the CDC. Researchers say the newly approved drug Wegovy could help many who struggle with obesity lose weight. adamkaz/Getty Images hide caption

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Obesity Drug's Promise Now Hinges On Insurance Coverage

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Advocates for expanding Medicaid in Kansas staged a protest outside the entrance to the statehouse parking garage in Topeka in May 2019. Today, twelve states have still not expanded Medicaid. The biggest are Texas, Florida, and Georgia, but there are a few outside the South, including Wyoming and Kansas. John Hanna/AP hide caption

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John Hanna/AP

12 Holdout States Haven't Expanded Medicaid, Leaving 2 Million People In Limbo

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Kathleen McAuliffe, a home care worker for Catholic Charities in a Portland, Maine, suburb, helps client John Gardner with his weekly chores. McAuliffe shops for Gardner's groceries, cleans his home and runs errands for him during her weekly visit. Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News

A doctor reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. The announcement was a surprise because the company stopped two studies of aducanumab in 2019 after partial results suggested it was not working. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Approves Aducanumab — A Controversial Drug For Alzheimer's

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After experiencing a suicidal crisis earlier this year, Melinda, a Massachusetts 13-year-old, was forced to remain 17 days in the local hospital's emergency room while she waited for a space to open up at a psychiatric treatment facility. She was only allowed to use her phone an hour a day in the ER; her mom visited daily, bringing books and special foods. Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother

Kids In Mental Health Crisis Can Languish For Days Inside ERs

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The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly difficult for unpaid caregivers, with many reporting symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. Portra Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images via Getty Images

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

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Domeniqu works on his computer at his home in Crownpoint. Adria Malcolm for NPR hide caption

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Adria Malcolm for NPR

After Months Of Special Education Turmoil, Families Say Schools Owe Them

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Mark Forrest is back fishing after rehabilitation with the IpsiHand device helped him regain use of his right hand. Mark Forrest hide caption

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Mark Forrest

New Device Taps Brain Signals To Help Stroke Patients Regain Hand Function

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Therapist Kiki Radermacher was one of the first members of a mobile crisis response unit in Missoula, Mont., which started responding to emergency mental health calls last year. That pilot project becomes permanent in July and is one of six such teams in the state — up from one in 2019. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

President Barack Obama, left, shakes hands with Nathan Copeland, right, in 2016. Copeland demonstrates how he can control a robotic arm and feel when the robotic hand is touched. Dr. Jennifer Collinger, one of Copeland's doctors, watches, center. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

President Barack Obama bumped fists with Nathan Copeland during a tour of innovation projects at the White House Frontiers Conference at the University of Pittsburgh in 2016. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Scientists Bring The Sense Of Touch To A Robotic Arm

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After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Even after full vaccination against COVID-19, people who have had organ transplants are urged by their doctors to keep wearing masks and taking extra precautions. Research shows the strong drugs they must take to prevent organ rejection can significantly blunt their body's response to the vaccine. DigiPub/Getty Images hide caption

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Vaccination Against COVID 'Does Not Mean Immunity' For People With Organ Transplants

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Elvis Presley got his polio vaccination from Dr. Harold Fuerst and Dr. Leona Baumgartner at CBS' Studio 50 in New York City on Oct. 28, 1956. The chart-topping singer took part in a March of Dimes campaign to convince teens to get vaccinated. Seymour Wally/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images hide caption

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Seymour Wally/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images