On Disabilities On Disabilities

On Disabilities

Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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Two reports from the federal government have determined that many cases of abuse or neglect of elderly patients that are severe enough to require medical attention are not being reported to enforcement agencies by nursing homes or health workers — even though such reporting is required by law. Mary Smyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Mary Smyth/Getty Images

Health Workers Still Aren't Alerting Police About Likely Elder Abuse, Reports Find

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Jeannine sorts through a binder of writing assignments from her therapy. In keeping a journal about her past experiences with pain, she noticed that the pain symptoms began when she was around 8 — a time of escalating family trauma at home. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images
Leonardo Santamaria for NPR

Desperation And Broken Trust When Schools Restrain Students Or Lock Them In Rooms

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Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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Lenh Vuong, a clinical social worker at Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, checks on a former John Doe patient she recently helped identify. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN
Cornelia Li for NPR

From Gloom To Gratitude: 8 Skills To Cultivate Joy

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In February, Justin Kelley was among the workers at about 1,000 Walmarts who learned that their jobs as people greeters would be eliminated. Like Kelley, many of them were workers with disabilities who found themselves in limbo. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

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Alina Selyukh/NPR

'My Whole Life Is On Hold': As Walmart Eliminates Greeters, A Dream In Limbo

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The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

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David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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stock_colors/Getty Images

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

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A guard escorts a detained immigrant from his "segregation cell" back into the general population at the Adelanto Detention Facility in November 2013. Today the privately run ICE facility in Adelanto, Calif., houses nearly 2,000 men and women and has come under sharp criticism by the California attorney general and other investigators for health and safety problems. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Watchdogs Cite Lax Medical And Mental Health Treatment Of ICE Detainees

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HHS Secretary Alex Azar at a White House roundtable discussion of health care prices in January. Azar tells NPR his office is now in "active negotiations and discussion" with drugmakers on how to make HIV prevention medicines more available and "cost-effective." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How HHS Secretary Reconciles Proposed Medicaid Cuts, Stopping The Spread Of HIV

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Dr. Carlos Gutierrez examines a young girl at a shelter in El Paso that was set up for recent migrants. The girl's mother said her daughter's deep cough arose while the family was in immigration custody. Anna Maria Barry-Jester/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Anna Maria Barry-Jester/Kaiser Health News

A certified nursing assistant wipes Neva Shinkle's face with chlorhexidine, an antimicrobial wash. Shinkle is a patient at Coventry Court Health Center, a nursing home in Anaheim, Calif., that is part of a multicenter research project aimed at stopping the spread of MRSA and CRE — two types of bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, speaks to state legislators in 2018. Bevin, who is running for re-election this fall, asked the federal government to impose work requirements on many people who receive Medicaid. Bevin's predecessor, a Democrat, did not seek these requirements when he expanded the program under the Affordable Care Act. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

For people with a rare condition known as misophonia, certain sounds like slurping, chewing, tapping and clicking can elicit intense feelings of rage or panic. Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Misophonia: When Life's Noises Drive You Mad

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Federal records show that the average fine for a health or safety infraction by a nursing home dropped to $28,405 under the Trump administration, down from $41,260 in 2016, President Obama's final year in office. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

The college admissions and bribery scandal revealed that some were taking advantage of a system meant to help students with disabilities. Ryan Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Ryan Johnson for NPR

Why The College Admissions Scandal Hurts Students With Disabilities

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A combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella protects kids against all three illnesses with one shot. Courtney Perry/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Perry/The Washington Post/Getty Images

States Move To Restrict Parents' Refusal To Vaccinate Their Kids

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