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All 84 residents of Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Riverside, Calif., were evacuated from the facility in early April after 39 residents tested positive for the coronavirus. Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Discharging COVID-19 Patients To Nursing Homes Called A 'Recipe For Disaster'

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President Trump's daily briefings on the COVID-19 pandemic have introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Evan Vucci/AP Photo hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Long Before COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci 'Changed Medicine In America Forever'

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If one person in the household is sick with COVID-19, everyone else in the home should consider themselves as possibly having an asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic infection, even if they feel fine, doctors say. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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sorbetto/Getty Images

When Lex Frieden broke his hip, a Texas hospital decided against an operation. Frieden, a quadriplegic since 1967, would never walk, so the surgery wasn't necessary, the doctors reasoned, a decision that left him with lasting pain. Mack Taylor / Houston METRO hide caption

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Mack Taylor / Houston METRO

People With Disabilities Fear Pandemic Will Worsen Medical Biases

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Former Vice President Joe Biden at a press conference in Wilmington, Del., in mid-March. His bid this week to allow 60-year-olds to get Medicare "reflects the reality," he says, "that, even after the current crisis ends, older Americans are likely to find it difficult to secure jobs." Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nurses check registration lists before testing patients for coronavirus at the University of Washington Medical Center on March 13 in Seattle. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

As classes move online, many schools fear students with disabilities could be left behind, in violation of federal laws. The Education Department calls this reading of the law "a serious misunderstanding." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

MedStar Washington Hospital Center's "ready room" in Washington, D.C., has mostly been used to house emergency supplies — but some storage carts have been moved out to make way for patient assessment stations. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?

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Ventilators can be a temporary bridge to recovery — many patients in critical care who need them for help breathing get better. Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images hide caption

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Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images

As The Pandemic Spreads, Will There Be Enough Ventilators?

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A passenger checks flight information at Fiumicino airport in Rome, Italy. President Trump imposed a 30-day ban on most travelers coming from from European countries, beginning late Friday E.T. Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images

President Trump signs an $8.3 billion emergency spending bill in the White House Friday. That's significantly more than he originally requested from Congress. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Where That $8.3 Billion In U.S. Coronavirus Funding Will And Won't Go

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The Trump administration said Wednesday that inspectors will be dispatched to determine whether staff at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Wash., followed infection-control rules in the weeks leading up to deaths of residents there from COVID-19. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Scientists at the Casey Eye Institute, in Portland, Ore., have have injected a harmless virus containing CRISPR gene-editing instructions inside the retinal cells of a patient with a rare form of genetic blindness. KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

In A 1st, Scientists Use Revolutionary Gene-Editing Tool To Edit Inside A Patient

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Sarah Ziegenhorn and Andy Beeler shared a selfie while hiking in Texas' Big Bend National Park in December 2018. Beeler died of an opioid overdose last March. Ziegenhorn traces his death to the many obstacles to medical care that Beeler experienced while on parole. Sarah Ziegenhorn hide caption

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Sarah Ziegenhorn

They Fell In Love Helping Drug Users. But Fear Kept Him From Helping Himself

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The house that John High rents with his son in Norman, Okla., doesn't even have a windowless room he could retreat to in a tornado, he says, and he can't afford to build a a wheelchair-accessible storm shelter. Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Jackie Fortier/StateImpact Oklahoma

Many Tornado Alley Residents With Disabilities Lack Safe Options In A Storm

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This image from an electron microscope shows a cross-sectional view of an oligodendrocyte (blue) among nerve fibers coated with myelin (dark red). In models of autism spectrum disorder, oligodendrocytes appear to create too much or too little myelin. Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/Science Source

Researchers Link Autism To A System That Insulates Brain Wiring

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Overall, U.S. health spending is more than twice the average of other Western nations, and it's not just a matter of high drug prices. No wonder voters list health and the high price of care as one of their major election concerns as they head to the polls. YinYang/Getty Images hide caption

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YinYang/Getty Images

The number of pets on planes has become a hot-button issue of late as emotional support animals have become more common than ever. Shelly Yang/Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Shelly Yang/Kansas City Star/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Federal Government May Tighten Restrictions On Service Animals On Planes

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Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

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