On Disabilities On Disabilities

On Disabilities

Amber England, who led the successful campaign for a ballot initiative to give 200,000 more Oklahomans health coverage, talked with supporters online this week. Voters narrowly approved the Medicaid expansion measure Tuesday, despite opposition by the state's governor and legislature. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Matt Ford is seen in Verona, Wis., with one of his caregivers, Grace Brunette. An accident in 1987 left Ford paralyzed in all four limbs. He needs help getting in and out of bed, preparing meals, using the bathroom and driving. Brunette recently finished a physician assistant program at the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Matt Ford hide caption

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Matt Ford

Kelly Womochil, an aide at Enterprise Estates Nursing Center in Enterprise, Kan., tries on a poncho that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending to nursing homes to protect against the coronavirus. Pamela Black hide caption

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Pamela Black
Stephanie Adeline/NPR

COVID-19 Infections And Deaths Are Higher Among Those With Intellectual Disabilities

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President Trump announced in May that he was taking hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against COVID-19. But a study published Wednesday finds no evidence the drug is protective in this way. GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images

No Evidence Hydroxychloroquine Is Helpful In Preventing COVID-19, Study Finds

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Avid Traveler Who Worked To Help Students With Disabilities Dies From COVID-19

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Feda Almaliti with her son, 15-year-old Muhammed, who has severe autism. "Muhammed is an energetic, loving boy who doesn't understand what's going on right now," she says. Feda Almaliti hide caption

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Feda Almaliti

'He's Incredibly Confused': Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

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People With Disabilities Face Additional Challenges During The Pandemic

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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People With Disabilities Fear Discrimination In Coronavirus Response

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A hospital patient in Stamford, Conn., who has COVID-19 symptoms gets his temperature checked. Severe infections with the novel coronavirus have been unusually high among African Americans and Latinos in many hospitals. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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All 84 residents of Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Riverside, Calif., were evacuated from the facility in early April after 39 residents tested positive for the coronavirus. Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Discharging COVID-19 Patients To Nursing Homes Called A 'Recipe For Disaster'

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President Trump's daily briefings on the COVID-19 pandemic have introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Evan Vucci/AP Photo hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Long Before COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci 'Changed Medicine In America Forever'

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If one person in the household is sick with COVID-19, everyone else in the home should consider themselves as possibly having an asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic infection, even if they feel fine, doctors say. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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sorbetto/Getty Images

When Lex Frieden broke his hip, a Texas hospital decided against an operation. Frieden, a quadriplegic since 1967, would never walk, so the surgery wasn't necessary, the doctors reasoned, a decision that left him with lasting pain. Mack Taylor / Houston METRO hide caption

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Mack Taylor / Houston METRO

People With Disabilities Fear Pandemic Will Worsen Medical Biases

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