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'The Long COVID Survival Guide' to finding care and community

According to the CDC, out of all the American adults who have had COVID — and that's a lot of us — one in five went on to develop long COVID symptoms. While so many are struggling with this new disease, it can be hard for people to know how to take care of themselves.

'The Long COVID Survival Guide' to finding care and community

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Cinde Lucas, whose husband Rick has suffered from long COVID, examines the many supplements and prescription medications he tried while looking for something to combat brain fog, depression and fatigue. Blake Farmer/ WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/ WPLN

Long-COVID clinics are wrestling with how to treat their patients

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After moving out of his Columbia Falls, Mont., home, which he can no longer afford, Kim Hilton plans to live in his truck with his dog, Amora, while he waits for a spot at an assisted living facility to open up. Aaron Bolton for KHN hide caption

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Aaron Bolton for KHN

More older Americans become homeless as inflation rises and housing costs spike

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Evan Woody has needed round-the-clock care since his brain injury and lives with his parents in Dunwoody, Ga. His father, Philip, says his family has some plans in place for Evan's future, but one question is still unanswered: Where will Evan live when he can no longer live with his parents? Philip Woody hide caption

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Philip Woody

Susie Talevski has gone through years of legal back-and-forth with the state agency in Indiana that operates the nursing home where her father, Gorgi, resided before his death. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

The federal government's new opioid prescribing guidelines may help doctors better manage patients with chronic pain who need consistent doses of pain medicines. For example, one patient takes tramadol regularly for serious pain caused by osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease. Jose M. Osorio/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Jose M. Osorio/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

How some doctors discriminate against patients with disabilities

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Office desks remain vacant during a spike in COVID-19 cases in London on Dec. 14, 2021. Richard Baker/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Baker/In Pictures via Getty Images

Dr. Devika Bhushan went public about her bipolar disorder while serving as California's Acting Surgeon General. She writes: "I have never been more convinced that to dispel mental health stigma, professionals who feel comfortable need to speak our truths — to spread the understanding that mental health conditions, especially serious ones, are treatable." Ashish Kundra hide caption

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Ashish Kundra

Bennett Markow looks to his big brother, Eli (right), during a family visit at UC Davis Children's Hospital in Sacramento. Bennett was born four months early, in November 2020. Crissa Markow hide caption

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Crissa Markow

The heartbreak and cost of losing a baby in America

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Margaret Davis (left) and Delisa Williams (right) became acquainted when they moved into the Salvation Army Center of Hope shelter, just outside Charlotte, N.C. Both women receive federal benefits, but the monthly amounts aren't high enough for them to be able to rent an apartment. Logan Cyrus for KHN hide caption

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Logan Cyrus for KHN

Even though the sisters hope a successful drug treatment for their family's form of dementia will emerge, they're now planning for a future without one. "There's a kind of sorrow about Alzheimer's disease that, as strange as it seems, there's a comfort in being in the presence of people who understand it," Ward says. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

With early Alzheimer's in the family, these sisters decided to test for the gene

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Georgia Linders got sick with COVID in the spring of 2020 and never recovered. Her ongoing battle with long COVID has prevented her from working. She spends her days advocating for COVID longhaulers like herself and painting, one of the few activities that doesn't wear her out. Georgia Linders hide caption

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Georgia Linders

Millions of Americans have long COVID. Many of them are no longer working

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Judy Heumann, center wheelchair, is given an ovation at the swearing in as U.S. Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Service in Berkeley, California Tuesday, June 29, 1993. Judge Gail Bereola, left, did the swearing in, with Berkeley Mayor Loni Hancock, standing left and sign language interpreter Joseph Quinn and Julie Weissman, right, in attendance with a large audience. Susan Ragan/AP hide caption

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Susan Ragan/AP