On Disabilities On Disabilities

When wildfire smoke choked their community last summer, Amy Cilimburg (left), the director of Climate Smart Missoula, helped Joy and Don Dunagan, of Seeley Lake, Mont., get a HEPA air filter through a partnership with the Missoula City-County Health Department. Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

When Wildfire Smoke Invades, Who Should Pay To Clean Indoor Air?

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Wildfire smoke filled the sky in Seeley Lake, Mont. on Aug. 7, 2017. Weather effects concentrated the accumulating smoke, chronically exposing residents to harmful substances in the air. InciWeb hide caption

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InciWeb

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

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This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Jessica Porten went to a doctor's appointment with her daughter, Kira, to get help with postpartum depression. She soon found herself in the company of police who escorted her to a hospital's emergency department. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Nurse Calls Cops After Woman Seeks Help For Postpartum Depression. Right Call?

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When President Trump decided to stop making the cost-sharing reduction payments to health insurers, New York and Minnesota lost significant funding to a health program that covers more than 800,000 low-income residents. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Creating A Community For People With Developmental Disabilities

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Matilde Gonzalez (left) and Cesar Calles hold their son, Cesar Julian Calles, 10 months old, as he is immunized with a flu shot in January at Sea Mar Community Health Center in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Then-Gov. Mike Pence announced in 2015 that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services had approved Indiana's waiver to experiment with Medicaid requirements. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Evangelina Padilla-Vaccaro, now cured of a serious genetic illness — thanks to a successful stem cell treatment — playing recently in a public park. The bubble around her is just for fun. Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro hide caption

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Courtesy of Alysia Padilla-Vaccaro

The body's under a lot of stress during a bout of flu, doctors say. Inflammation is up and oxygen levels and blood pressure can drop. These changes can lead to an increased risk of forming blood clots in the vessels that serve the heart. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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laflor/Getty Images

Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart Attack

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A sign in support of Oregon's Measure 101 is displayed by a homeowner along a roadside in Lake Oswego, Ore. Tuesday's special election puts decisions over how the state funds Medicaid in voters' hands. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

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Gillian Flaccus/AP

Part Of Oregon's Funding Plan For Medicaid Goes Before Voters

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The new tax credit sidesteps a common pitfall in the eyes of many Republicans by avoiding a mandate — it doesn't require employers to provide paid family leave. Instead, the law offers firms a financial incentive to provide the coverage. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

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James Meadours (left), Debbie Robinson and Thomas Mangrum share their stories about sexual assault. Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR

In Their Own Words: People With Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Rape

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