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Economy

President Biden holds a semiconductor during remarks before signing an executive order on the economy at the White House on Feb. 24. On Monday, senior members of his team met with leaders across various industries to discuss a shortage of semiconductors. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

White House Convenes Summit To Address Supply Shortage Crippling Auto Plants

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As the first Black woman to ever serve as chief economist at the Labor Department, Janelle Jones is one of the Biden administration officials facing the task of addressing historic economic disparities that have only intensified during the pandemic. Janelle Jones hide caption

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Janelle Jones

This Top Biden Economist Has A Plan: Create Jobs, Address Inequality, Ignore Trolls

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Visitors leave the Wonder Wheel ride after the re-opening of Coney Island's amusement parks on Friday. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

In Coney Island, The Wonder Wheel Spins Again

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Auto warranty scams are making our phones unusable. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

About Your Extended Warranty

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Indicator Favs: How An Econ Experiment Changed Lives

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Michael Regan speaks during his confirmation hearing in February to be the Environmental Protection Agency administrator. In an NPR interview Thursday, Regan says technology that helps eliminate emissions is key to tackling climate change. Caroline Brehman/AP hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/AP

EPA Chief Says Biden Infrastructure Bill Will Help The U.S. Face Climate Change

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The Loud family tree Fred Wardlaw hide caption

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Fred Wardlaw

How Jacob Loud's Land Was Lost

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CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP via Getty Images

Indicator Favs: The Rise Of The Machines

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The Texas Supreme Court has allowed an emergency order to expire. Housing groups warn that this could result in thousands of people losing their homes to eviction. Tenants' rights advocates, like those pictured here in Boston, have pushed for stronger protections for renters during the pandemic. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Texas Courts Open Eviction Floodgates: 'We Just Stepped Off A Cliff'

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A record low number of homes for sale is pushing up prices and making it harder for first-time buyers to afford homeownership. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

The Housing Market Is Wild Right Now — And It's Making Inequality Worse

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Indicator Favs: The Recession Predictor

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The International Monetary Fund has raised its forecasts for both the U.S. and the global economies, crediting rapid COVID-19 vaccine rollouts and relief efforts. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen listens during a meeting with President Biden in the White House on March 5. Yellen on Monday proposed a minimum global tax rate for corporations. Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Pool/Getty Images

Janet Yellen Proposes Bold Idea: The Same Minimum Corporate Tax Around The World

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Indicator Favs: Let's Get Ready to Retail

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College senior Bao Ha has applied to more than 100 jobs. So far, he's had no luck. Courtesy of Bao Ha hide caption

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Courtesy of Bao Ha

Generation Unemployed: Another Class Of Graduates Faces Pandemic-Scarred Future

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Sean Hawksford trying to buy a house. Sean Hawksford hide caption

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Sean Hawksford

Two Indicators: Boomtown & Bye Bye

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A store in Miami displays a "We are hiring" sign on March 5. U.S. employers added 916,000 jobs in March, the biggest number since August, amid an improving pandemic outlook and trillions of dollars in stimulus passed by Congress. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Roaring Back: Employers Add 916,000 Jobs As Economy Emerges From Winter Slump

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NPR

Peak Gasoline And Cardiff Fare Thee Well

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A mobile ordering sign is seen on March 30 at a vending station in Nationals Park, home of the Washington Nationals. The Nats, along with many other teams in baseball, are implementing new safety protocols, including for ordering food, as a new season kicks off on Thursday. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images

Baseball Is Back, So Grab A Hot Dog And A Beer. Just Keep A Safe Distance

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