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Rohit Chopra, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is working toward regulation to remove medical bills from consumer credit reports. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

Why a financial regulator is going after health care debt

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The Israeli Minister of Finance reacts to the financial ratings agency Moody's decision to downgrade Israel's credit rating in March 2023. Maya Alerruzzo/AP hide caption

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Maya Alerruzzo/AP

LEFT: Maria Lares is a longtime teacher and PTA Treasurer at Villacorta Elementary in La Puente, CA. RIGHT: Sophia Fabela (left) and Samantha Nicole Tan (right) are two students at Villacorta who consider themselves pretty good sales kids. Sarah Gonzalez/NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/NPR

The secret world behind school fundraisers and turning kids into salespeople

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A home available for sale is shown in Austin, Texas, on Oct. 16, 2023. Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers argues the consumer price index may understate the pain of rising interest rates, such as higher mortgages. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

A U.K. four-day workweek pilot has shown lasting benefits more than one year later. Dragon Claws hide caption

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Dragon Claws

These companies tried a 4-day workweek. More than a year in, they still love it

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TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images

How to make an ad memorable

Super Bowl ads this year relied heavily on nostalgia and surprise –– a few tricks that turn out to embed information into our brains. Today, neuroscientist Charan Ranganath joins the show to dissect the world of marketing to its biological fundamentals and reveal advertisers' bag of tricks.

How to make an ad memorable

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Matt Slocum/AP

Reddit's public Wall Street bet

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For lease sign in Los Angeles. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

A controversial idea at the heart of Bidenomics

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MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP via Getty Images
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
JASPER JACOBS/BELGA MAG/AFP/Getty Images
MICHELE SPATARI/AFP via Getty Images

Wind turbines are visible from the highway in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The state and the country are betting big on offshore wind power as a means to combat climate change. Rachel Wisniewski/For the Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Rachel Wisniewski/For the Washington Post/Getty Images

A Second Wind For Wind Power?

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Indian men line up at a registration office set up in a technical college in the northern Indian city of Lucknow, where they hope to sign up to work in Israel. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

With Palestinian laborers shut out of Israel, Indian workers line up for jobs there

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The cargo ship Genco Picardy was hit by a low-grade missile in the Gulf of Aden in January. In recent months, the Houthis, a tribal militant group from Yemen, have launched attacks on ships in response, they say, to Israel's war in Gaza. Indian Navy/AP hide caption

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Indian Navy/AP

How the Navy came to protect cargo ships

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A "for rent" sign in front of a home in December 2023 in Miami, Florida. The price of rental properties began skyrocketing in 2020. They've come down a small amount, but studies show people across incomes are spending huge parts of their income on rent, leaving little left for other expenses. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Rents Take A Big Bite

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