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Esther Duflo of France waves after receiving the Princess of Asturias award for Social Sciences from Spain's King Felipe VI at a ceremony in Oviedo, northern Spain. She is only the second woman to win the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, sharing it with Abhijit Banarjee and Michael Kremer. Jose Vicente/AP hide caption

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Jose Vicente/AP

3 Win Nobel Prize In Economics For Work In Reducing Poverty

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U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He in the Oval Office at the White House October 11, 2019 in Washington, DC. President Trump announced a 'phase one' partial trade deal with China. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Workers in green polo shirts and blue caps monitor machines making plastic products at the Dongguan Fangjie Printing and Packaging Company. Jolie Myers/NPR hide caption

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Jolie Myers/NPR

Has The Trade War Taken A Bite Out Of China's Economy? Yes — But It's Complicated

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A new rule proposed by the Labor Department would allow employers to require waitstaff and others to share their tips with kitchen staff. But labor advocates say it could allow bosses to take advantage of their workers. studiocasper/Getty Images hide caption

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studiocasper/Getty Images

Itzel Alarcon recently moved into a rental development near Denver. She says she's renting for now because she saw relatives hurt by the housing crash and is worried that home values might drop again. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Renters Only: These New Homes Aren't For Sale

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A worker assembles an industrial valve at Emerson Electric Co.'s factory in Marshalltown, Iowa. The manufacturing sector has seen a slowdown amid the ongoing trade war. Tim Aeppel/Reuters hide caption

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Tim Aeppel/Reuters

Hiring Steady As Employers Add 136,000 Jobs; Unemployment Dips To 3.5%

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Shirley Sherrod is co-founder of the New Communities Land Trust founded 50 years ago as a safe haven for African-American farmers thrown off their land during the civil rights movement. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

5 Decades Later, New Communities Land Trust Still Helps Black Farmers

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The World Trade Organization says the United States can impose tariffs on up to $7.5 billion worth of goods from the European Union as retaliation for illegal subsidies to Airbus — a record award from the trade body. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

Bob Orozco, 89, has been in fitness his entire adult life. He began working for the Laguna Niguel YMCA in 1984 and leads the Silver Sneakers Club, a free fitness program for Medicare beneficiaries. "I probably will work until something stops me," Orozco says. Morgan Baker for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Baker for NPR