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India, Farming, and the Free Market

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Workers at Amazon's facility in Bessemer, Ala., held a historic vote on whether to form the company's first warehouse union. Bill Barrow/AP hide caption

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Bill Barrow/AP

What Amazon's Defeat Of Union Effort Means For The Future Of American Labor

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A Beige Revolution - Shaking up the Beige Book

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Pro-union Amazon warehouse worker Jennifer Bates vows at a rally in Birmingham to keep fighting to unionize the Amazon Bessemer warehouse. Stephan Bisaha for NPR hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha for NPR

Big Union Loss At Amazon Warehouse Casts Shadow Over Labor Movement

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Barbara Gaught stands outside the home she's now renting in Billings, Mont., with her 5-year-old son, Blazen, and their dog, Arie. Gaught and her family were evicted from the mobile home they had owned outright and lived in for 16 years because they fell behind on 'lot rent' for the little plot of land under the mobile home. Louise Johns for NPR hide caption

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Louise Johns for NPR

Losing It All: Mobile Home Owners Evicted Over Small Debts During Pandemic

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After The Banks Leave

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Diners eat lunch at Max's Oyster Bar in West Hartford, Conn., on March 19. Retail sales surged last month as $1,400 relief payments and easing coronavirus restrictions led shoppers to open their wallets. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Signs Of Economic Boom Emerge As Retail Sales Surge, Jobless Claims Hit Pandemic Low

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Rep. Katie Porter, a Democrat from California, during a House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in March 2020. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

What Is Infrastructure? It's A Gender Issue, For Starters

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Shawn Steffee is business agent at Boilermakers Local 154 in Pittsburgh, and worries a transition to clean energy could cost him pay and hurt his pension. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Biden Says His Climate Plan Means Jobs. Some Union Members Are Skeptical

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What McDonald's Tells Us About The Minimum Wage

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Dolly Parton, Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda in a scene from the movie "9 to 5" Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Workin' 9 To 5

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President Biden unveils a $2 trillion infrastructure plan in Pittsburgh on March 31. In his speech, Biden said the plan would help the U.S. compete with China. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

For Biden, China Rivalry Adds Urgency To Infrastructure Push

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How Burlington Powered Through 2020 Without A Website

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Consumer prices jumped in March, marking a return of inflation, but the Federal Reserve insists any uptick will be temporary. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Consumer Prices Jumped. Should You Worry? That's Sparking A Heated Debate

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Council of Economic Advisers Chair Cecilia Rouse and council member Heather Boushey talk to reporters with Press Secretary Jen Psaki in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on March 24. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Biden Administration's Women-Led Push For Investment In 'Care Infrastructure'

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How Amazon Defeated The Union

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President Biden holds a semiconductor during remarks before signing an executive order on the economy at the White House on Feb. 24. On Monday, senior members of his team met with leaders across various industries to discuss a shortage of semiconductors. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

White House Convenes Summit To Address Supply Shortage Crippling Auto Plants

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As the first Black woman to ever serve as chief economist at the Labor Department, Janelle Jones is one of the Biden administration officials facing the task of addressing historic economic disparities that have only intensified during the pandemic. Janelle Jones hide caption

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Janelle Jones

This Top Biden Economist Has A Plan: Create Jobs, Address Inequality, Ignore Trolls

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Visitors leave the Wonder Wheel ride after the re-opening of Coney Island's amusement parks on Friday. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

In Coney Island, The Wonder Wheel Spins Again

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Auto warranty scams are making our phones unusable. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

About Your Extended Warranty

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Indicator Favs: How An Econ Experiment Changed Lives

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