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A man panhandles along a sidewalk in downtown San Francisco, California on Tuesday, June, 28, 2016. Josh Edelson /Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson /Getty Images

Voters May Tax Tech Companies To Fight Homelessness

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Sara Murawski, pictured on the patio of her new condo in Portland, Ore., has been dreaming of homeownership for two decades. This year, she became a first-time homebuyer — seeing first hand how Portland's red-hot housing market is starting to cool and become a little friendlier to buyers. Courtesy of Justin Dias hide caption

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Courtesy of Justin Dias

New Homebuyers Face A Friendlier Housing Market, Thanks To Cooldown

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Don Skidmore stands in front of a sign for United Auto Workers Local 735, the union chapter he represented as president when he was a General Motors employee. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Life After GM: A Family Upended By Auto Plant Closure Took Divergent Paths

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An Iranian woman walks past the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran, which bears a mural depicting the Statue of Liberty with a dead face. With just days to go until the U.S. plans to snap more sanctions back into place, questions linger about what the move spells for the world. Aatta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aatta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Job seekers line up at a technology fair in Los Angeles in March. Employers added more jobs than analysts expected last month, as the jobless rate remained at a nearly 50-year low of 3.7 percent. Monica Almeida/Reuters hide caption

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Monica Almeida/Reuters

Engraving from a series of images titled "The Great Yellow Fever Scourge — Incidents Of Its Horrors In The Most Fatal District Of The Southern States." Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

How Yellow Fever Turned New Orleans Into The 'City Of The Dead'

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Soybeans are unloaded onto a truck in Tiskilwa, Ill. Daniel Acker/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Getty Images

Caught Between Trump's Tariffs And Tax Changes, Soybean Farmers Face Uncertain Future

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President Trump announces a plan to overhaul how Medicare pays for certain drugs during a Thursday speech at the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It's dorm life for adults: A PodShare co-living building in Venice Beach, Calif., where dorm beds go for about $1,400 per month with shared kitchens and bathrooms. Courtesy PodShare hide caption

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Courtesy PodShare

Can't Find An Affordable Home? Try Living In A Pod

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Load Trail has had a hard time hiring welders to fabricate its trailers since Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents arrested about a quarter of its workforce in August. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

After ICE Raid, A Shortage Of Welders In Tigertown, Texas

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When the mines in the North Fork Valley started laying off employees, Eric and Teresa Neal hired and retrained former coal miners to learn how to work with fiber optic cable. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Rural Colorado Coal County Was Struggling. Then A Tech Company Brought New Jobs

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Employees work on the assembly line of the Tiguan model at the Volkswagen car plant in Puebla, central Mexico, in March. The auto sector is a key focus of the newly revised North American Free Trade Agreement. Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images