The Economy: U.S and World Economic News NPR news on the U.S. and world economy, the World Bank, and Federal Reserve. Commentary on economic trends. Subscribe to NPR Economy podcasts and RSS feeds.

Economy

Mario Tama/Getty Images

American fast-food hamburger restaurant Carl's Jr, in the center of St. Petersburg. OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images

Burgers in Russia, Juul vaporized, THE trademarked

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107577923/1107598180" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Did you put money down to buy a home that wasn't built yet and now are struggling to afford it because of higher mortgage rates? We want to hear from you. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Last year, President Biden announced "Build Back Better World," meant to compete with China's Belt and Road Initiative. This year at the G-7, Biden will unveil the first projects. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden said the G-7 would counter Chinese influence. This year, he'll try again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106979380/1107633763" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Brandon Schwedes of Port Orange, Fla., with his 11-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son. Schwedes had to move this year when the landlord dramatically raised the rent, then was outbid before finding another place he could afford. Brandon Schwedes hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Schwedes

A Bitcoin ATM. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Does Bitcoin have a grip on the economy?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107194450/1107203657" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A "For Lease" sign is posted in front of a house available for rent on March 15, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Jerome Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Lots of onions. Jess Jiang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jess Jiang/NPR

The tale of the Onion King (Update)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106861476/1106920030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marilynn Malerba stands next to a photograph of late Chief Ralph Sturges at tribal offices in Uncasville, Conn., on March 4, 2010. On Wednesday, President Biden announced his intent to appoint her U.S. treasurer in a historic first. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Hill/AP

Jerome Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee on June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Powell says recession 'a possibility' but not likely

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106735608/1106863301" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden pitched a three-month break on the federal fuel tax to help American drivers face the highest inflation in four decades, but critics said the proposal is unlikely to work. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

People are reflected in the window of the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The price of free stock trading

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106468243/1106477253" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Carlos and Jessica Deviana sit in the back of their father's SUV, which they were using as a bedroom after Hurricane Michael destroyed their home in Panama City, Fla., in October 2018. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1102389274/1106459281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Joe Biden talks to the media after walking on the beach Monday with his granddaughter Natalie Biden, left, and his daughter Ashley Biden at Rehoboth Beach, Del. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Nick Schmidt poses with his wife after picking up his brand new electric F-150. Schmidt was the first buyer to get the F-150 Lightning as auto makers are betting billions in an electric future. Courtesy of Nick Schmidt hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Nick Schmidt

He's the first buyer of the electric F-150. Why he's the future of the car industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1104920656/1106051985" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">