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Economy

Jill Mallen gets her groceries at a food pantry because of soaring inflation. She says she's a "confused" voter — a registered Democrat who feels Republicans did a better job of managing the economy. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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How inflation is influencing politics in a bellwether Florida county

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The surprising economics of digital lending

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The drought in Europe

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A market to bet on the future

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Bassam al-Sheikh Hussein looks through the bank's window in Beirut, Lebanon during the hostage standoff on Thursday. He surrended after several hours of negotiations in exchange for a portion of his savings. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Hussein Malla/AP

A man who held up a bank demanding his own money becomes an unlikely hero

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AP Macro gets a makeover

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Starbucks says regional staff of the National Labor Relations Board repeatedly crossed the line of neutrality to help union organizers in Kansas. Here, activists protest against Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz in New York City last month. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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The Internal Revenue Service building is seen in Washington, D.C., on April 5. The IRS got $80 billion in new funding as part of the climate and health care bill passed by Congress on Friday. Most of that money will be used to target wealthier tax evaders. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The IRS just got $80 billion to beef up. A big goal? Going after rich tax dodgers

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City on Aug. 5. The majority of America's top companies have reported strong earnings, but warning signs about the economy are also emerging from their corporate earnings. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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3 warning signs about the economy coming out of America's top companies

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Paying for the Inflation Reduction Act

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., leaves a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Friday, where he spoke to reporters about the Inflation Reduction Act. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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