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Economy

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on September 21, 2022 in New York City. Stocks dropped in the final hour of trading after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell announced that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point in an attempt to continue to tame inflation. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Stock markets drop as Wall Street takes a gloomy view of the economy

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An Uber driver arrives to pick up a passenger in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Donna Dunn, 49, works as the office manager at a healthcare clinic in Booker, Texas. Despite getting a raise, she has struggled to pay her family's bills as prices have risen faster than her paycheck. Donna Dunn hide caption

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Donna Dunn

Workers are changing jobs and getting raises, and still struggling financially

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Both home prices and the pace of home sales are falling nationally as higher mortgage rates cool off the market. tommy/Getty Images hide caption

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Home prices see biggest drop in 9 years, thanks to higher mortgage rates

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Renovations continue on the Marriner S. Eccles Federal Reserve Board Building on September 19, 2022 in Washington, DC. The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) concluded its two-day meeting on interest rates this afternoon. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Fed orders another super-sized interest rate hike as it battles stubborn inflation

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Patagonia's tax break, explained

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The fake market in crypto

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Vibecession Vibe Session with Nikara Presents Black Wall Street James Sneed/James Sneed hide caption

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James Sneed/James Sneed

Vibecession Vibes Session

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Poverty, heists, .eth: Coulda been worse

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In happier times, Susan Morrison and her husband Calvin liked to vacation in their motor home. But they've had to park it this year because of the high cost of diesel fuel. Susan Morrison/Susan Morrison hide caption

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Susan Morrison/Susan Morrison

Americans are paying more and getting less as inflation hits home

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A tentative deal announced Thursday would avert a strike on the nation's freight lines with the potential to throw supply chains into chaos. Above, a CSX freight train travels through Alexandria, Va. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP
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The Beigie Awards: Tough choices for ranchers

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In 1993, Queen Elizabeth II and her heir, then-Prince Charles, reached a deal with the government in which they agreed to voluntarily pay taxes — but to be exempt from an inheritance tax. Mother and son are seen here in 2019 in London. Paul Edwards/WPA Pool / Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Edwards/WPA Pool / Getty Images

NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 23: UGG boots on display at an event introducing Hailey Baldwin for UGG Classic Street on August 23, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for UGG) Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for UGG hide caption

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The Good, the Bad, and the Uggly

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A super-sized labor experiment

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