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Economy

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How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap

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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced on Thursday that certain sectors in most of the state can expand their occupancy limits starting Monday. He also said that hospitals in those regions can now resume elective procedures and that eligible long-term care facilities can resume limited visitation next week. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Millions of gig workers have come to depend on a government lifeline that's set to expire at the end of the year. Above, a man wearing a face mask walks past a sign saying "now hiring" on May 14 in Arlington, Va. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Gig Workers Depend On New Unemployment Program, But Fear It'll End Soon

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Workers with disabilities can be paid less than minimum wage. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says that has trapped workers in "exploitative and discriminatory" job programs. erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

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erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images

Workers With Disabilities Can Earn Just $3.34 An Hour. Agency Says Law Needs Change

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

How Immigration Is Changing The U.S. Economy

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has said the Fed is ready to support the economy as a recovery falters. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

People walk through the newly reopened mall at Hudson Yards in New York. U.S. shoppers spent more prudently in August and retail sales grew a tepid 0.6% from July. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Two million Americans have started freelancing in the past 12 months, according to a new study from Upwork, a freelance job platform. And that has increased the proportion of the workforce that performs freelance work to 36%. Ada Yokota/Getty Images hide caption

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Ada Yokota/Getty Images

Jobs In The Pandemic: More Are Freelance And May Stay That Way Forever

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People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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An almost empty Metro station is seen in Washington, D.C., on July 21. The region's employers worry about the safety of workers using the transit system during the pandemic. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A Smarter Approach To Lockdowns

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Median household income rose sharply last year, while poverty declined to 10.5% — the lowest since records began in 1959, according to the Census Bureau. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

American Incomes Were Rising, Until The Pandemic Hit

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United Auto Workers members leave the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Warren Truck Assembly plant after a shift in May in Warren, Mich. Car sales are picking up again, but automakers face a problem: getting enough workers. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

As Auto Industry Roars Back, Worker Shortages Throw Up Roadblocks

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Protesters march Aug. 21 outside a courthouse in Houston, where evictions are continuing despite a moratorium ordered recently by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Jen Rice/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Jen Rice/Houston Public Media

Despite A New Federal Ban, Many Renters Are Still Getting Evicted

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Plastic piles up at Garten Services in Salem, Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Waste Land

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Grocery prices have fallen in recent months but are still 4.6% higher than at this time last year. Here, a woman stock shelves in a deli in June at a Washington, D.C., supermarket. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

More Groceries, Less Gas: The Pandemic Is Shaking Up The Cost Of Living

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Making The Most Of Scarce Space

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Kim Ryu for NPR

'I Try So Hard Not To Cry': Nearly Half Of U.S. Households Face A Financial Crisis

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