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A Puerto Rican flag flies on an empty beach at Ocean Park, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2020. Puerto Rico's nearly five-year bankruptcy battle was resolved Tuesday, after a federal judge signed a plan that slashes the U.S. territory's public debt load as part of a restructuring and allows the government to start repaying creditors. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Oxfam report focuses on the wealth gap, which widened during the pandemic

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A shortage of bus drivers is causing problems for those who use public transportation

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How inflation affects food insecurity

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Former U.S. Deputy Treasury Secretary Sarah Bloom Raskin, shown here before the opening ceremony of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation finance ministers meeting in Beijing in 2014 is one of the three nominees President Joe Biden announced for the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors on Friday. Andy Wong/AP file photo hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP file photo

Biden announces three more Federal Reserve nominees

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Errata Carmona for NPR

More than 1 million fewer students are in college. Here's how that impacts the economy

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Consumer prices are even higher as businesses try to keep up with people eager to buy

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Consumer prices — including gas — are surging at their highest annual pace in around 40 years. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Inflation is still surging and some Democrats see one culprit: Greedy companies

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Fed chair Jerome Powell takes questions from Senate committee in confirmation hearing

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Climeworks factory with it's fans in front of the collector, drawing in ambient air and release it, as largely purified CO2 through ventilators at the back is seen at the Hellisheidi power plant near Reykjavik on October 11, 2021. HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP via Getty Images

Capital One has become the nation's largest bank to end overdraft fees for all of its customers. Federal regulators are taking a hard look at bank overdraft fees, which hit customers with lower incomes the hardest. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

People hate overdraft fees. Banks are ditching or reducing them

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Employers added 199,000 jobs in December — less than half of forecasters' prediction

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A sign seeking workers is displayed at a fast food restaurant in Portland, Ore., on Dec. 27, 2021. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Employers added only 199,000 jobs in December even before omicron started to surge

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