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Though Prices Aren't As High As Before, West Texas Enjoys Oil Revival

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Positive pregnancy tests can also be a positive indicator for the future of the economy, according to new research published by The National Bureau of Economic Research. SKXE/Flickr hide caption

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SKXE/Flickr

Boats sail on the Nile River in Cairo, Egypt, last October. Tensions between Egypt and upstream Nile basin countries, Sudan and Ethiopia, have flared up again over the construction and effects of a massive dam being built by Ethiopia on the Nile River. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

Most workers are covered by the Family Medical Leave Act, which allows up to 12 weeks of leave per year to care for family members. But that leave is unpaid. Now, Republicans are making paid family leave a legislative policy. Jasmine Mithani and Katie Park/NPR hide caption

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Jasmine Mithani and Katie Park/NPR

Lawmakers Agree On Paid Family Leave, But Not The Details

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell testifies Tuesday before the House Financial Services Committee in Washington. "My personal outlook for the economy has strengthened since December," he said. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

New Fed Chief Sees Interest Rates Continuing To Rise As Economy Strengthens

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Chevrolet Camaros are lined up at General Motors' Lansing Grand River Assembly Plant in Michigan in 2015. Automakers in the U.S. say if costs go up as a result of a renegotiated NAFTA, they would be less competitive. Rebecca Cook/Reuters hide caption

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Automakers Say Trump's Anti-NAFTA Push Could Upend Their Industry

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Citizenship candidates wait for a naturalization ceremony to begin in downtown Manhattan on July 2, 2013 in New York City. U.S. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

How 1 Tweet From Kylie Jenner Caused Snap, Inc. To Lose $1 Billion

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A worker builds an aircraft engine at Honeywell Aerospace in Phoenix in 2016. Aerospace is among the manufacturing sectors that could be affected by import tariffs on steel and aluminum. Alwyn Scott/Reuters hide caption

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Alwyn Scott/Reuters

Trump Trade Action Could Boost Steel, Aluminum Manufacturers, Hurt Other Industries

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Kentucky bourbon could be the target of new tariffs from European allies if President Trump approves restrictions on steel and aluminum imports. Luke Sharrett/Getty Images hide caption

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Kentucky Bourbon, Wisconsin Cheese Could Be Targets In Trade War

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Economists Are Confident The Fed Will Keep Control Of Inflation

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A Chinese worker loads steel tubes onto a truck in China's Jiangsu province in 2016. The Trump administration is considering imposing steep tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images