The Economy: U.S and World Economic News NPR news on the U.S. and world economy, the World Bank, and Federal Reserve. Commentary on economic trends. Subscribe to NPR Economy podcasts and RSS feeds.

Aetna announced one of its largest pay hikes recently. CEO Mark Bertolini says he believes it largely could pay for itself by making workers more productive. Courtesy of Aetna hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Aetna

Health Insurer Aetna Raises Wages For Lowest-Paid Workers To $16 An Hour

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/403257223/403362719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a joint press conference at the White House with President Obama on Tuesday. Abe is urging U.S. lawmakers to approve a trans-Pacific trade deal. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

SEC Proposes New Rules For Linking Executive Pay With Firm Performance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/403094749/403094750" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jason Furman, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said consumers generally haven't been using the savings from lower gasoline prices to spend on other things. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe approach the podiums for a joint press conference Tuesday at the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. President Obama is hoping to finalize a new trade agreement with Japan and other Asian nations soon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Obama Confident In Asia Trade Pact, But Track Record For Deals Is Spotty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402940026/402971545" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka: "Candidates can't hedge their bets any longer, and expect workers to rush to the polls in excitement." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Union Head Presses Candidates, Clinton On Trade

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402856039/402856040" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People line up to visit St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. Although flights to Europe remain expensive, the falling euro is still leading to a surge in American tourists visiting Europe. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Medichini/AP

Europe May Be On Sale, But The Ticket To Get There Isn't

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401468613/402856150" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Our modern relationship to property — namely that it's burdensome to own, and therefore less valuable — has allowed the sharing economy to expand. Gustav Dejert/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Gustav Dejert/Ikon Images/Corbis

When The Sharing Economy Brings Unexpected Experiences

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402563555/402632464" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A reporter stands outside the front door of a house registered to a trading company operated by Navinder Singh Sarao in Hounslow, west of London. on April 22, 2015. Sarao was arrested in connection with the Wall Street flash crash of 2010. Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images

Who, Or What, Crashed The Market In A Flash In 2010?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/402136396/402160065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"Why does everyone have to be here at the same time? Why do we need to know how many hours a week people work?" — Ricardo Semler James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

toggle caption
James Duncan Davidson/TED

What Happens When You Run a Company With (Almost) No Rules?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/401742828/401811230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the Nasdaq closes above the record set 15 years ago, stock analysts are debating whether the market is approaching another bubble. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bryan Thomas/Getty Images

15 Years After The Dot-Com Bust, A Nasdaq Record

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/397113284/401799410" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript