Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These? : NPR Ed Remember that skeleton hanging in the front of your classroom? In some schools, those were actual human remains. We used science to figure out the story behind one of them.
NPR logo

Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594907805/596529900" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These?

Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These?

Classroom Skeleton: Whose Bones Are These?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594907805/596529900" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
YouTube

Remember that skeleton hanging in the front of your biology — or art — classroom?

It's possible those bones are not plastic, but actual human remains. A lot of classroom skeletons, in high schools, universities and medical schools, are real.

My high school in Erie, Pa., has one that has been hanging in the back of the art room for years. Students use it to draw and sculpt and learn about anatomy. For this episode of Skunk Bear, teachers and administrators let us borrow the skeleton. We then used a bunch of scientific tools — usually applied at crime scenes and archaeological digs — to investigate this person's past: Who was this person? And where did the bones come from?


Follow Skunk Bear, NPR's science show, on YouTube and Facebook.

nprEd

HOW LEARNING HAPPENS

About