K-12 : NPR Ed From kindergarten through high school.

Students wear clear backpacks outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., on Monday. The bags are one of a number of security measures the school district has enacted as a result of the Feb. 14 shooting at the school that killed 17. Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Making Schools Safer: Harsh Consequences, Or Second Chances?

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The one-room schoolhouse of Colonial days was a simple design built from local materials. Kids sat on benches with the oldest in the back. While nostalgia has kept these in our minds, they were hardly conducive for much beyond basic rote learning. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Century-Old Decisions That Impact Children Every Day

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Huchon writes five questions that can be used to evaluate the veracity of a news story. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

A Conspiracy Video Teaches Kids A Lesson About Fake News

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Unionized Or Not, Teachers Struggle To Make Ends Meet, NPR/Ipsos Poll Finds

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College Decision Day Brings Relief, Excitement And Big Worries About Money

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NPR/Ipsos Poll: Most Americans Support Teachers' Right To Strike

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Thousands of Oklahoma teachers and supporters rally in the state's capital. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

How Oklahoma Parents Are Dealing With Teacher Walkouts

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Students work in an elementary school classroom in North Carolina. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Disparities Persist In School Discipline, Says Government Watchdog

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Maggie Webb, a junior high school math teacher at Clark Avenue School in Chelsea, Mass., volunteered to teach in a high-needs area in exchange for a federal grant called the TEACH grant. But a new report found that Webb and thousands of others had their grants converted to loans because of seemingly minor issues. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Teachers Sarah Lindenberg and Kara Cisco chat with Kelly Brown, the BARR coordinator at St. Louis Park. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How More Meetings Might Be The Secret To Fixing High School

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In this April 30, 1974, file photo, Linda Brown, right, and her two children pose for a photo in their home in Topeka, Kan. Brown, the Kansas girl at the center of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down racial segregation in schools, died March 25 at age 75. AP hide caption

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