npr Ed We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

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HOW LEARNING HAPPENS

Karthik Nemmani, 14, of McKinney, Texas, holds the Scripps National Spelling Bee Championship trophy with Adam Symson, the Scripps president and chief executive officer. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

The findings discussed in Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experience of Young American Children have been cited more than 8,000 times, according to Google Scholar. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Let's Stop Talking About The '30 Million Word Gap'

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Kaitlyn McCollum teaches at Columbia Central High School in Tennessee. After being told her TEACH grant paperwork was late, her grants were converted to loans. "I'm on the phone in between classes ... trying to get all of this information together, crying, trying to plead my case," she says. Stacy Kranitz for NPR hide caption

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Stacy Kranitz for NPR

Education Department Launches 'Top-To-Bottom' Review Of Teachers' Grant Program

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Teachers and supporters hold signs during a 'March For Students And Rally For Respect' protest in Raleigh, North Carolina on Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Now It's North Carolina Teachers' Turn: How Did We Get Here? What's Next?

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Cristina Chase Lane (left) and WinnieHope Mamboleo recently graduated from North Carolina State University's College of Education. Leah Jarvis/NC State College of Education hide caption

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Leah Jarvis/NC State College of Education

Before They Walk Into A Classroom, These New Teachers Will March On The N.C. Capitol

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