Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

The James Webb space telescope is an infrared telescope that will observe the early universe, between one million and a few billion years in age. NASA hide caption

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NASA

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

In December, NASA is scheduled to launch the huge $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope, which is sometimes billed as the successor to the aging Hubble Space Telescope. NPR correspondents Rhitu Chatterjee and Nell Greenfieldboyce talk about this powerful new instrument and why building it took two decades.

After Years Of Delays, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope To Launch In December

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Miguel Cardona, U.S. secretary of education, speaks during a news conference at the White House on Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona accompanies North High School's marching band on the cowbell during a Monday pep rally in Eau Claire, Wis. Tim Gruber for NPR hide caption

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Tim Gruber for NPR

The Education Secretary Plays Hardball (And A Cowbell) To Push For Safe Schools

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Julian Hernandez (right), 12, a seventh-grader at Hillside School in Illinois, says he feels much safer being back in school knowing that a weekly testing program is identifying those who are sick with COVID-19. Christine Herman/WILL hide caption

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Christine Herman/WILL

How Some Schools Are Using Weekly Testing To Keep Kids In Class — And COVID Out

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, seen at a news conference last week. His newly appointed surgeon general on Wednesday signed protocols allowing parents to decide whether their children should quarantine or stay in school if they are asymptomatic after being exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

A judge has dismissed some of the biggest lawsuits against Ohio State University over sexual abuse by Dr. Richard Strauss against student athletes. Angie Wang/AP hide caption

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Angie Wang/AP

A male Bougainville Whistler (Pachycephala richardsi), a species endemic to Bougainville Island. This whistler is named after Guy Richards, one of the collectors on the Whitney South Sea Expedition. Iain Woxvold hide caption

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Iain Woxvold

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, pictured here in March, begins a back-to-school tour of the Midwest on Monday. Chris Kleponis/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Kleponis/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Stakes Feel Higher Than Ever As The Education Secretary Welcomes Students Back

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School administrators and police are warning parents about a trend in which students destroy objects in school bathrooms for attention on social media. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Devon Erickson appears in court at the Douglas County Courthouse in Castle Rock, Colo., on May 15, 2019. The former high school student was convicted of first degree murder and other charges for a 2019 shooting attack inside a suburban Denver high school that killed one student and injured eight others. Joe Amon/The Denver Post via AP, Pool, File hide caption

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Joe Amon/The Denver Post via AP, Pool, File

According to the CDC, between March and May, 2020, hospitals across the country saw a 24% increase in mental health emergency visits by kids aged 5 to 11 years old, and a 31% increase for kids 12 to 17. Annie Otzen/Getty Images hide caption

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Annie Otzen/Getty Images
James J. Reddington

Jason Reynolds: How Can We Connect With Kids Through The Written Word?

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Before classes begin for the day, elementary music teacher Penelope Quesada gathers her most commonly used cleaning supplies and places them around the classroom in places of convenience. Natosha Via for NPR hide caption

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Natosha Via for NPR

A shortage of school bus drivers for the Boston Public Schools has led to some delays this month. Gov. Charlie Baker is calling up National Guard members to help alleviate the shortage in some areas of the state. David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

John Wilson (second left) holds his wife's hand (second right) as they leave the courthouse in Boston after the first day of his trial in the college admissions scandal on Monday. Stew Milne/AP hide caption

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Stew Milne/AP

A girl leads her mother and brothers as they arrive at Brooklyn's PS 245 on Monday in New York. Classroom doors are swinging open for about a million New York City public school students in the nation's largest experiment of in-person learning during the coronavirus pandemic. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

For the first time since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, all of New York City's public school students are expected to return to classes in person today. Stephanie Keith/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It's Back-To-School Season In NYC. Here's How 3 Moms Are Handling It

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The Unexpected Reason Arizona's Mask Mandate Ban May Be Unconstitutional

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Peter Hemans spent the night at New Jersey's Hackensack Middle School, where he is the head custodian, to make sure emergency sump pumps were working properly. Principal Dr. A. Galiana hide caption

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Principal Dr. A. Galiana