Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Nearly 60,000 public school students in El Paso, Texas, begin school on Monday. Mallory Falk/KERA hide caption

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Mallory Falk/KERA

'This Is Not Going To Be Easy': El Paso Students Start School In Shooting's Aftermath

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People cycle past a building at Peking University in Beijing in 2016. The university hosts Yenching Academy, a prestigious graduate studies program. Thomas Peter/Reuters hide caption

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Thomas Peter/Reuters

American Graduates Of China's Yenching Academy Are Being Questioned By The FBI

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Students perform in The Little Mermaid, the sixth-most popular musical in the 2016-2017 school year. R. Bruhn /Courtesy of Educational Theatre Association hide caption

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R. Bruhn /Courtesy of Educational Theatre Association

The Most Popular High School Plays And Musicals

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NPR sent photographers to locations across the country to document the stark differences between school districts right next to each other. This is what they saw. Preston Gannaway/Talia Herman/Alex Matzke/Elissa Nadworny/Jesse Neider/Photo collage by LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Preston Gannaway/Talia Herman/Alex Matzke/Elissa Nadworny/Jesse Neider/Photo collage by LA Johnson/NPR
Yasmine Gateau for NPR

This Supreme Court Case Made School District Lines A Tool For Segregation

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Wyoming Valley West High School in Plymouth, Pa. Officials with the school district are not responding to several offers to settle debt students accrued from not paying for cafeteria meals. Courtesy of Luzerne County hide caption

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Courtesy of Luzerne County

Offers Pour In To Cover Pa. Students' Meal Debt, But School Officials Not Interested

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The courthouse in Luzerne County, Pa., where officials this month sent letters to parents who had unpaid cafeteria debt, threatening to take parents to court if the obligations were not settled. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Don't Have Lunch Money? A Pennsylvania School District Threatens Foster Care

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Beyond 'Good' Vs. 'Bad' Touch: 4 Lessons To Help Prevent Child Sexual Abuse

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LA Johnson/NPR

'I'm Drowning': Those Hit Hardest By Student Loan Debt Never Finished College

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In this 2011 photo, Hu Jintao, then China's president, visits the Confucius Institute at the Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago. China established more than 100 Confucius Institutes, which provide language and culture programs, at U.S. schools. But at least 13 universities have dropped the program due to a law that raises concerns about Chinese spying. Chris Walker/AP hide caption

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Chris Walker/AP

As Scrutiny Of China Grows, Some U.S. Schools Drop A Language Program

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From left, students Erin Addison, Evan Addison and Andrew Arevalo of the Steel City Academy look over a planning map of Gary, Ind. Courtesy of Bill Healy hide caption

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Courtesy of Bill Healy

These Teens Started Podcasting As A Hobby, Then It Turned Into Serious Journalism

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Nineteen states have adopted "mandatory retention" policies, which require third-graders who do not show sufficient proficiency in reading to repeat the grade. Larry W. Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Larry W. Smith/Getty Images

States Are Ratcheting Up Reading Expectations For 3rd-Graders

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