Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona participates in an event at Dartmouth College in January. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Biden seeks student debt relief for millions

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A group of children don eclipse glasses to watch the 2017 solar eclipse at Grand Tetons National Park in Wyoming. VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A lot of kids got to see the last total eclipse. What they remember may surprise you

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California legislators in 2019 passed the law that requires all the state's 33 public university campuses to provide abortion pills. It took effect in January 2023, but LAist found that basic information for students to obtain the medication is often nonexistent. Jackie Fortiér/LAist hide caption

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Jackie Fortiér/LAist

Early in life, Sam (left) and John were much more similar than they may seem today. "They both did not wave, they didn't respond to their name, they both had a lot of repetitive movements," says their mother, Kim Leaird. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

These identical twins both grew up with autism, but took very different paths

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Around the country, state legislatures and school districts are looking at ways to keep cellphones from being a distraction in schools. monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images hide caption

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monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

Oregon schools are struggling to recover academic learning losses, according to a recent study from researchers at Harvard and Stanford. Brian A Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian A Jackson/Getty Images

Why Oregon schools' pandemic recovery lags behind much of the nation

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Maryland Gov. Wes Moore speaks to reporters near the collapsed Francis Scott Key Bridge on March 27, 2024 in Baltimore, Md. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Baltimore bridge collapse has put the spotlight on Maryland's young Black governor

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The University of Idaho Marching Band, wearing Yale T-shirts, performs at the NCAA Tournament game between Yale and San Diego State in Spokane, Wash., on Sunday. The band has been honored in Connecticut for filling in as Bulldogs. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Student volunteers prepare two balloons for a morning launch in Cumberland, Md., as part of a nationwide project to study the April 8 eclipse. Meredith Rizzo for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo for NPR

On eclipse day, hundreds of students will send up balloons for science

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Second graders practice using solar eclipse glasses outside Winchester Village Elementary School in Indianapolis. Kaiti Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Kaiti Sullivan for NPR

How an Indianapolis teacher is using the solar eclipse to inspire her students

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Parents wait for news about the kidnapped LEA Primary and Secondary School Kuriga students in Kuriga, Kaduna, Nigeria, on March 9, 2024. Nearly 300 schoolchildren abducted from their school in northwest Nigeria's Kaduna state have been released, the state governor said Sunday, March 24, more than two weeks after the children were seized from their school. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Senators meet in the senate chamber at the Statehouse, Thursday, Feb. 1, 2024, in Indianapolis. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Activists and students protest in front of the Supreme Court during a rally for student debt cancellation in Washington, D.C., in February 2023. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
Richard Stephen/Getty Images

This year it's a slow crawl to financial aid packages for students

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High school students taking part in the University of Washington's annual MisInfo Day earlier this month. They are looking at pictures of faces to tell whether the images were created with generative AI tools or authentic. Kim Malcolm/KUOW hide caption

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Kim Malcolm/KUOW

AI images and conspiracy theories are driving a push for media literacy education

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Keystone Features/Getty Images

Alabama governor signs anti-DEI law

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Alabama lawmakers approved a bill barring public colleges and other entities from using money to support diversity, equity and inclusion programs. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images hide caption

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Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

Gov. Ron DeSantis' war on 'woke' appears to be losing steam in Florida

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