Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

School Colors Episode 7: "The Sleeping Giant." LA Johnson hide caption

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LA Johnson

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks at the White House on April 27. The Biden administration proposed a dramatic rewrite of campus sexual assault rules on Thursday, moving to expand protections for LGBTQ students, bolster the rights of victims and widen colleges' responsibilities in addressing sexual misconduct. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Columbine Principal Frank DeAngelis listens to his students, survivors of the shooting, in April 2019 as he attends "Columbine 20 Years Later: A Faith-based Remembrance Service" at Waterstone Community Church in Littleton, Colo. A dozen students and one teacher were massacred by two heavily armed students. Joe Amon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Amon/AFP via Getty Images

A small, growing group of survivors advises school leaders after mass shootings

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

6 things we've learned about how the pandemic disrupted learning

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Daniel Duron and Kenny Butler, who started college in prison, participate in a mountain hike with their Pitzer College classmates and professors after resuming their classes on campus. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Getting a bachelor's degree in prison is rare. That's about to change

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Supreme Court rules Maine's tuition assistance program must cover religious schools

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Brit Oliphant connected with her fourth-grade student, Seth Snyder through skateboarding. Brit was shocked to find out Seth was so passionate about skating but didn't have a skateboard of his own. She started an organization, Boards 4 Buddies, to change that. Nic Hibdige hide caption

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Nic Hibdige

Teachers across the country report high levels of stress and burnout after a school year marked by protests, Covid surges and gun violence. (Photo by Jon Cherry/Getty Images) Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Teachers Reflect on a Tough School Year: 'It's Been Very Stressful'

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After a rough couple of years, teachers are feeling the pressure. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

We asked teachers how their year went. They warned of an exodus to come

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LA Johnson

Students from George Washington University wear their graduation gowns outside the White House in May. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Americans support student loan forgiveness, but would rather rein in college costs

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University of Oregon students and staff protest on campus in Eugene, Ore. in May of 2014, against sexual violence in the wake of allegations of rape brought against three UO basketball players by a fellow student. Chris Pietsch/AP hide caption

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Chris Pietsch/AP

The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

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Annick Press

A dozen students at Sitʼ Eeti Shaanáx̱ Glacier Valley Elementary School in Juneau, Alaska, ingested floor sealant during breakfast on Tuesday, believing it was milk. At least one student sought medical attention at a hospital. Ben Hohenstatt/AP hide caption

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Ben Hohenstatt/AP

Former U.S. Rep. Joe Cunningham arrives at a debate for Democrats seeking their party's nomination in South Carolina's governor's race on Friday, June 10, 2022, in Columbia, S.C. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

When Black Boys Die, a gunplay written and directed by William Electric Black. Jonathan Slaff hide caption

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Jonathan Slaff

How the arts can help children think about gun violence

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