Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

The college admissions and bribery scandal revealed that some were taking advantage of a system meant to help students with disabilities. Ryan Johnson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Johnson for NPR

Why The College Admissions Scandal Hurts Students With Disabilities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703006521/704137590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Westminster Choir, performing with the New York Philharmonic and conductor Colin Davis in New York City in 2003. Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images
Ran Zheng for NPR

Sparkle Unicorns And Fart Ninjas: What Parents Can Do About Gendered Toys

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705824731/706777785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Duke University is paying the U.S. $112.5 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting falsified research data to win or keep federal grants. Here, a photo shows the Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C., in 2008, when some of the fraud was alleged to have taken place. Chris Keane/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Keane/Reuters

President Donald Trump speaks during an executive order signing on Thursday. Trump signed an executive order requiring colleges to certify that they accept free and open inquiry in order to get federal grants. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

John Awiel Chol Diing, who grew up in refugee camps, is now studying agricultural science at Earth University in Costa Rica. Above: He visited Washington, D.C., last week as a 2019 Next Generation Delegate, a program run by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. "To be dedicating his life to giving back — his was a voice we had to have," says Marcus Glassman of the council. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Sun/NPR

Students attend a Ukrainian language and literature lesson at a school in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk in 2016. In 2018, students in four cities across Ukraine received training to help them identify disinformation, propaganda and hate speech. Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aleksey Filippov/AFP/Getty Images

White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" clash with counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia during the "Unite the Right" rally August 12, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In the wake of the college admissions scandal that has ensnared a slew of wealthy parents, college coaches and others in the world of academia, USC has placed a hold on the accounts of students allegedly connected to the scheme. Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR
LA Johnson/NPR
LA Johnson/NPR

Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697492255/701939274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript