Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Ryan Johnson for NPR

Starting in 2024, U.S. students will take the SAT entirely online

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Seventh and eighth grade students attend class at Olive Vista Middle School on Jan. 11 in Sylmar, Calif. Los Angeles students will be required to wear non-cloth masks. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
Anke Gladnick for NPR

How colleges are dealing with high COVID case counts on campus

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Sen. Barbara Blackmon, D-Canton, speaks at the well in the Mississippi Senate Chamber in Jackson on Thursday. Blackmon was among the Black lawmakers who walked out of the Senate Chamber in protest on Friday. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Rupali Limaye is a behavioral and social scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Janice Chang for NPR

Student loan payments resume in May. Here are 7 ways to prepare

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New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced efforts to temporarily employ National Guard troops and state workers as substitute teachers and child care center workers during a news conference at Sante Fe High School in Santa Fe, N.M., on Tuesday. Morgan Lee/AP hide caption

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Morgan Lee/AP
Andrew Heavens / TED

Dave Eggers: How Can Kids Learn Human Skills in a Tech-Dominated World?

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Cori Berg is executive director of the Hope Day School early childhood program in Dallas. Cooper Neill for NPR hide caption

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Cooper Neill for NPR

Parents and caregivers of young children say they've hit pandemic rock bottom

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History teacher Wendy Leighton holds a copy of "They Called us Enemy," about the internment of Japanese Americans, while speaking about marginalized with her students at Monte del Sol Charter School, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Santa Fe, N.M. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

Gov. Kevin Stitt issued an executive order on Tuesday that permits state employees to work as substitute teachers while retaining their regular jobs with no reduction in pay or benefits. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

The University of Michigan has agreed to a $490 million settlement with hundreds of people who say they were sexually assaulted by Robert Anderson, a former sports doctor at the school. Robert Kalmbach/Bentley Historical Library University of Michigan via AP hide caption

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Robert Kalmbach/Bentley Historical Library University of Michigan via AP

In this Jan. 30 2017, file photo, University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel speaks during a ceremony at the university, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Schlissel has been removed as president of the University of Michigan due to the alleged "inappropriate relationship with a University employee," the school said. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Teacher burnout and thinning substitute teacher rolls combined with the continuing fallout of the winter surge is pushing public school leaders to the brink of desperation. Lawmakers are responding by temporarily rewriting hiring rules. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Georgetown University and several other schools including Yale, MIT, and Notre Dame were named in a lawsuit alleging that they colluded to limit financial aid. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

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Albuquerque Public Schools superintendent Scott Elder poses outside of Highland High School. Albuquerque Public Schools says classes will be canceled Friday for a second day after a cyberattack. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

As part of the settlement, the loan servicing company Navient agreed to pay $95 million for states to offer affected borrowers some reimbursement — roughly $260 each to 350,000 borrowers. Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters

Navient reaches a deal to cancel $1.7 billion in student loan debts

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Virginia's Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin, pictured on the campaign trail, speaks with now Lt. Gov.-elect Winsome Sears after a rally in Fredericksburg, Va., Oct. 30, 2021. Youngkin and Sears, both Republicans, won election on Nov. 2, and will be sworn into office Jan. 15, 2022. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Virginia's first Black woman lieutenant governor says we need to move on from slavery

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Errata Carmona for NPR

More than 1 million fewer students are in college. Here's how that impacts the economy

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Caroline Tung Richmond of Frederick, Md., with her son, 4, and daughter, 7. Caroline Tung Richmond hide caption

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Caroline Tung Richmond

Caroline thought her daughter was doing OK with home learning. Then she got a note

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