Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Miguel Cardona, President Biden's nominee for U.S. education secretary, speaks during a December event announcing his nomination. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The Chicago Teachers Union voted on Sunday to continue remote work only, in defiance of the school district's plans for K-8 teachers and staff to return to classrooms this week. Here, a sign in front of Martin Luther King, Jr. Elementary School in September. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Nathan Grebil takes the temperature of a fourth-grader during a health screening in October at Bel Aire Elementary School in Tiburon, Calif. Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Police clash with supporters of US President Donald Trump who breached security and entered the Capitol building in Washington D.C. Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

University of Tennessee head football coach Jeremy Pruitt directs players at a game on Oct. 12, 2019. University officials announced they will fire Pruitt and nine football team staff members after an investigation found a slew of likely NCAA violations. Carmen Mandato/Getty Images hide caption

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Carmen Mandato/Getty Images

Sandra's 17-year-old daughter, Lindsey, has autism. Lindsey thrives on routine, and got special help at school until the coronavirus pandemic cut her off from the trained teachers and therapists she'd come to rely on. Audra Melton for NPR hide caption

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Audra Melton for NPR

'I've Tried Everything': Pandemic Worsens Child Mental Health Crisis

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Didn't Get Enough Financial Aid For College? You Can Ask For More Money

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A fourth-grader eats breakfast at Mary L. Fonseca Elementary School in Fall River, Mass. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Why Billions In Food Aid Hasn't Gotten To Needy Families

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Supporters of President Trump roam the U.S. Capitol Rotunda after storming into the building on Wednesday. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

How To Talk To Kids About The Riots At The U.S. Capitol

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A first-grader raises her hand at Mary L. Fonseca Elementary School in Fall River, Mass., in November. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Where Is It Safe To Reopen Schools? New Research Offers Answers

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Jess Wade demonstrates how a tornado forms using a water bottle. Jess Wade hide caption

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Jess Wade

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

By day, Jess Wade is an experimental physicist at Imperial College London. But at night, she's a contributor to Wikipedia — where she writes entries about women and POC scientists. She chats with Emily Kwong about how Wikipedia can influence the direction of scientific research and why it's important to have entries about scientists from under-represented communities.

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

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Even with teachers working hard to educate their students virtually during the pandemic, they're growing increasingly anxious about the ones who aren't showing up to class at all. Sarah Gonzales for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

A Quiet And 'Unsettling' Pandemic Toll: Students Who've Fallen Off The Grid

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