Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

History teacher Wendy Leighton holds a copy of "They Called us Enemy," about the internment of Japanese Americans, while speaking about marginalized with her students at Monte del Sol Charter School, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Santa Fe, N.M. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

Gov. Kevin Stitt issued an executive order on Tuesday that permits state employees to work as substitute teachers while retaining their regular jobs with no reduction in pay or benefits. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

The University of Michigan has agreed to a $490 million settlement with hundreds of people who say they were sexually assaulted by Robert Anderson, a former sports doctor at the school. Robert Kalmbach/Bentley Historical Library University of Michigan via AP hide caption

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Robert Kalmbach/Bentley Historical Library University of Michigan via AP

In this Jan. 30 2017, file photo, University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel speaks during a ceremony at the university, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Schlissel has been removed as president of the University of Michigan due to the alleged "inappropriate relationship with a University employee," the school said. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Teacher burnout and thinning substitute teacher rolls combined with the continuing fallout of the winter surge is pushing public school leaders to the brink of desperation. Lawmakers are responding by temporarily rewriting hiring rules. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Georgetown University and several other schools including Yale, MIT, and Notre Dame were named in a lawsuit alleging that they colluded to limit financial aid. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

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Albuquerque Public Schools superintendent Scott Elder poses outside of Highland High School. Albuquerque Public Schools says classes will be canceled Friday for a second day after a cyberattack. Cedar Attanasio/AP hide caption

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Cedar Attanasio/AP

As part of the settlement, the loan servicing company Navient agreed to pay $95 million for states to offer affected borrowers some reimbursement — roughly $260 each to 350,000 borrowers. Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters

Navient reaches a deal to cancel $1.7 billion in student loan debts

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Virginia's Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin, pictured on the campaign trail, speaks with now Lt. Gov.-elect Winsome Sears after a rally in Fredericksburg, Va., Oct. 30, 2021. Youngkin and Sears, both Republicans, won election on Nov. 2, and will be sworn into office Jan. 15, 2022. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Virginia's first Black woman lieutenant governor says we need to move on from slavery

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Errata Carmona for NPR

More than 1 million fewer students are in college. Here's how that impacts the economy

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Caroline Tung Richmond of Frederick, Md., with her son, 4, and daughter, 7. Caroline Tung Richmond hide caption

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Caroline Tung Richmond

Caroline thought her daughter was doing OK with home learning. Then she got a note

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Cheri Warner (left) stands with her daughter, Brea, and speaks on Monday to fall for the Chicago school district and teacher's union to focus on getting students back in the classroom in Chicago. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

As students have returned to school this year, mental health issues related to the pandemic are surging. Cavan Images RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Cavan Images RF/Getty Images

Kids are back in school — and struggling with mental health issues

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In Chicago, the teachers union voted this week to return to virtual learning, citing COVID-19 concerns, despite district plans to continue in person. In response, the district canceled classes for its more than 300,000 students. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

What it really takes to keep schools open during the omicron surge

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Teachers tell NPR that exploring previous precedents can help students make sense of what happened on Jan. 6. For example: when invading British troops attacked Washington and set fire to the U.S. Capitol in 1814. Keith Lance/Getty Images hide caption

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Keith Lance/Getty Images

8 ways teachers are talking about Jan. 6 in their classrooms

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A sign on the door of Lowell Elementary School asks students, staff and visitors to wear a mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on Wednesday in Chicago. Classes at all of Chicago public schools have been canceled Wednesday by the school district after the teachers union voted to return to virtual learning. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Waukee School District teacher Liz Wagner, seen here in her home in Urbandale, Iowa, said last year she was on the front line of the COVID war. "Now I'm on the front line of the culture war, and I don't want to be there." Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP