Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

President Francois Hollande argues that homework puts poor children at a disadvantage, but others argue the extra work is needed to help those students succeed. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

Pencils Down? French Plan Would End Homework

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Administrators at the adult education center are concerned that the GED overhaul will make it harder for many test takers to complete the exam. Diane Orson/WNPR hide caption

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Diane Orson/WNPR

Educators Worry Revamped GED Will Be Too Pricey

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Cornell University just converted some of its grants into loans. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Math En Masse: Teaching Online For Free

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Students in environmental science professor Jeffery Stone's class watch as a seismic shaker truck rolls through Indiana State University's campus. Tony Campbell/Courtesy of Indiana State University hide caption

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Tony Campbell/Courtesy of Indiana State University

A pilot program in Mississippi requires low-income parents who receive subsidized child care to submit to biometric finger scans like this one, at Northtown Child Development Center in Jackson. Some parents and day care workers say the rule is unnecessary and discriminatory, but state officials say it will save money and prevent fraud. Kathy Lohr/NPR hide caption

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Kathy Lohr/NPR

Students Blake Jamar (from left), Ryan Clifton and Gregory Gonzales take apart a bicycle that generates electricity at Analy High School in Sebastopol, Calif. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption

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Jon Kalish for NPR

What's The Big Idea? Pentagon Agency Backs Student Tinkerers To Find Out

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Chinese schoolchildren during lessons at a classroom in Hefei, east China's Anhui province, in 2010. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

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