Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Bob Wilson, a San Diego real estate developer and restaurant owner, hands out $1,000 checks to students and staff from Paradise High School on Tuesday evening in Chico, Calif. The town of Paradise was largely destroyed by a wildfire this month. Loren Lighthall/AP hide caption

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Loren Lighthall/AP

"I think it's important to really understand where you're coming from, understand who your peers are, who your community is," DACA recipient and future Rhodes Scholar Jin Park says. Stephanie B. Mitchell/Harvard University hide caption

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Stephanie B. Mitchell/Harvard University

Meet Jin Park, The First DACA Recipient Awarded A Rhodes Scholarship

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In Parkland, Florida, site of a mass shooting this year, a commission is recommending that so-called 'stop the bleed' kits be put in every classroom. It comes amid a national push for medical training of educators, like those pictured at Southeast Polk High School in Pleasant Hill, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Parkland School Shooting Commission Calls For Code Red Alarms And Bleeding Control Kits

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A 2017 report by the Department of Education's Office of Federal Student Aid found that Navient, one of its student loan servicers, often did not tell borrowers about all of their repayment options. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

At least 36 students at a North Carolina school have become infected with chickenpox. The school has many students whose parents claimed a religious exemption from state vaccination requirements. Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images hide caption

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Milos Bataveljic/Getty Images

Former Title IX Official Outlines Changes To How Colleges Handle Sexual Assault Cases

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