Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Student Loan Rates Set To Double On July 1

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Student Facebook Use Might Affect Future Success

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President Obama spoke last month at commencement ceremonies at Morehouse College in Atlanta, which brought fresh attention — and scrutiny — to historically black colleges. Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tea Party members protest Common Core in Ocala, Fla., in April. The new educational standards, adopted by almost all the states, are the object of a growing conservative backlash. Bruce Ackerman/Ocala Star-Banner /Landov hide caption

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Bruce Ackerman/Ocala Star-Banner /Landov

What Does Supreme Court Ruling Mean For Affirmative Action?

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Students at the University of California, Los Angeles, rally in October to protest claims that race factored into the school's admission decisions. Neil Bedi/The Daily Bruin hide caption

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Neil Bedi/The Daily Bruin

School Hopes Talking It Out Keeps Kids From Dropping Out

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Copies of The Orange County Register slide through the presses. The Register is the country's 20th most-read daily, with a circulation of about 285,000. Grant Slater/KPCC hide caption

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Grant Slater/KPCC

Advocates of allowing home-schooled students to play on public school teams have dubbed legislation allowing it "Tim Tebow bills," after the former NFL quarterback who was home-schooled in Florida. Stephen Brashear/AP hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/AP

Home-Schooled Students Fight To Play On Public School Teams

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