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A controversial legal theory about the power state legislatures have over federal election rules has been backed by the conservative Honest Elections Project, which has filed multiple U.S. Supreme Court briefs on the topic, including one for a 2020 case about mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

This conservative group helped push a disputed election theory

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Voters in Milwaukee fill out ballots in Wisconsin's state primary on Tuesday. The top three Republican candidates for governor each cast doubt on the results of the 2020 election. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

Tim Michels, Wisconsin Republican candidate for governor, right, speaks as former President Donald Trump listens at a rally Friday, Aug. 5, 2022, in Waukesha, Wisc. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

With Trump's backing, Michels wins the Wisconsin GOP primary for governor

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Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021, Republican Gov. Phil Scott wears a mask as he takes the Oath of Office on the steps of the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt., beginning his third two-year term. Vermont is one of two states that holds elections for governor every two years. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP

From left, Rebecca Kleefisch, Tim Michels and Timothy Ramthun (not pictured) participate in a televised debate for the GOP nomination for Wisconsin governor on July 24 in Milwaukee. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

Ron DeSantis, seen speaking to reporters from Fox News in 2018 when he was running for governor of Florida, has been prominent in a recent trend of Republicans ignoring or actively avoiding mainstream press, particularly national outlets. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Republicans have long feuded with the mainstream media. Now many are shutting them out

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Arizona Republican candidate for governor Kari Lake speaks at an election-night gathering in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Tuesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A mural of Rep. John Lewis on a street named after him Feb. 11, in Nashville, Tenn. The late Lewis was part of a movement that marched downtown from the historically Black neighborhood of North Nashville to take part in lunch counter sit-ins. That same neighborhood is redistricted into a mostly white congressional district, which some Democrats are comparing past civil rights violations. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

Alie Utley and Joe Moyer react to their county voting against the proposed constitutional amendment during the Kansas for Constitutional Freedom primary election watch party in Overland Park, Kan., on Tuesday. Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Kaup/AFP via Getty Images

How the 2022 midterms strategy could change after the Kansas abortion vote

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President Biden started his presidency only selectively referring to his predecessor as "the former guy." But he's talking about Donald Trump frequently in recent weeks and months. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden used to keep Trump mentions to a minimum. Not anymore

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