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Democratic congressional candidate Rochelle Garza speaks with voters in Brownsville, Texas, in September. Many Latino voters in South Texas turned against Democrats during last year's presidential election — and winning them back could prove critical to the party's hopes of retaining control of Congress during next year's midterms. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

House Democrats have a new strategy to engage voters of color in the midterm elections

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Mayor Kim Janey wipes away tears as she delivers a farewell address in Roxburys Hibernian Hall in Boston, marking her historic term as the first woman and first Black mayor of Boston on Nov. 10. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Why Boston will need to wait longer for its 1st elected Black mayor

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Voters in New York soundly rejected two ballot measures that would have allowed for expanded voting access in the state. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

What 2021's recent elections tell us about voting in 2022 and beyond

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Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin speaks at a campaign rally at the Chesterfield County Airport on Monday. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Education In Virginia's Election: It Wasn't Just About Critical Race Theory

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Glenn Youngkin, governor-elect of Virginia, holds a broom while greeting attendees after speaking during an election night event in Chantilly, Va. Youngkin defeated Democrat Terry McAuliffe in Virginia's closely watched governor's race. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Supporters of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin celebrate during an election night rally on Tuesday in Chantilly, Va. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Virginia Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin arrives to speak at an election night party in Chantilly early Wednesday. Youngkin topped Democrat Terry McAuliffe, flipping the Virginia governor's office back to the GOP. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy speaks during an election night event at Grand Arcade at the Pavilion on Nov. 2, 2021 in Asbury Park, N.J. The AP called the race the Democrat on Nov. 3. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin speaks at a campaign rally at the Chesterfield County Airport on Monday. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

In Virginia's race for governor, Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin has rallied voters around national cultural divisions playing out in schools in his campaign against former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

As they elect a governor, Virginia voters show how all politics have become national

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Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Glenn Youngkin casts his ballot early, in September. Youngkin has walked a tight rope on voting issues ahead of Tuesday's election. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Republicans want more eyes on election workers. Experts worry about their intent

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President Biden, right, reacts after speaking at a rally for Democratic gubernatorial candidate and former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Tuesday in Arlington, Va. McAuliffe will face Republican Glenn Youngkin in the election on Nov. 2. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Virginia's race for governor is a test for Democrats' — and Trump's — staying power

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Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman on Tuesday was named to a top post overseeing election security within the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Redistricting reform advocates in Virginia pitched the creation of a new commission as a remedy to unfair political maps, like the ones shown on this poster from 2019, but the new group has struggled to reach consensus. Yasmine Jumaa/VPM hide caption

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Yasmine Jumaa/VPM

So far, flushing the 'toilet bowl' district is the cleanest part of Va. redistricting

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Then-President Donald Trump appears in front of the U.S. Capitol in 2018. Some of his most loyal supporters want him to return to power in Washington as speaker of the House if the Republican Party wins back control next year. Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

Just the idea of House Speaker Trump could be a dream or nightmare for each party

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Iowa state Rep. Joe Mitchell was first elected at age 21 and is now the co-founder of an organization looking to recruit fellow young conservatives to seek public office. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Snapchat is adding a feature to help young users run for political office

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Texas state senators are gathered in the Senate chamber on the first day of the 87th Legislature's third special session at the State Capitol on September 20, 2021 in Austin, Texas. Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem speaks during the Family Leadership Summit on July 16 in Des Moines, Iowa. Questions are floating around whether Noem had anything to do with the forced retirement of a state official after Noem's daughter was denied a real estate appraiser's license. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP