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US Representative Liz Cheney (R-WY) speaks to supporters at an election night event during the Wyoming primary election at Mead Ranch in Jackson, Wyoming on August 16, 2022. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Where Does Liz Cheney Go From Here?

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U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, an Alaska Republican, flashes a thumbs up to a passing motorist while waving signs Tuesday in Anchorage. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., appears at an Election Day gathering in Jackson, Wyo., to concede defeat in a GOP primary to Harriet Hageman, who was backed by former President Trump. Cheney vows that she will carry on her work to make sure Trump doesn't return to the presidency. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Liz Cheney is considering a presidential run to stop Trump after losing her House seat

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Liz Cheney's public battle with Trump may cost her the Wyoming House seat

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The National Basketball Association announced it will not hold any games on November 8 — Election Day for the 2022 midterms — in order to encourage fans to make a plan to vote. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

To encourage fans to vote, the NBA won't hold games on Election Day

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Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming speaks at a hearing held by the House Jan. 6 committee. Cheney, who serves as vice chair of the committee, is facing a likely defeat in Tuesday's GOP primary in Wyoming. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Will Trump's endorsements be a boost to candidates come fall?

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A controversial legal theory about the power state legislatures have over federal election rules has been backed by the conservative Honest Elections Project, which has filed multiple U.S. Supreme Court briefs on the topic, including one for a 2020 case about mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

This conservative group helped push a disputed election theory

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Voters in Milwaukee fill out ballots in Wisconsin's state primary on Tuesday. The top three Republican candidates for governor each cast doubt on the results of the 2020 election. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

Tim Michels, Wisconsin Republican candidate for governor, right, speaks as former President Donald Trump listens at a rally Friday, Aug. 5, 2022, in Waukesha, Wisc. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

With Trump's backing, Michels wins the Wisconsin GOP primary for governor

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Some voters doubt the Los Angeles mayoral candidates' promises to solve homelessness

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Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021, Republican Gov. Phil Scott wears a mask as he takes the Oath of Office on the steps of the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt., beginning his third two-year term. Vermont is one of two states that holds elections for governor every two years. Wilson Ring/AP hide caption

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Wilson Ring/AP