Energy Energy

Energy

Veronica Stovall, left, helped her father, Joseph L. Davis, apply for a federally-funded energy-efficiency program in 2021. It turned up significant repair needs. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

A low-income energy-efficiency program gets $3.5B boost, but leaves out many in need

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Solar and wind power projects have been booming in California, like the Pine Tree Wind Farm and Solar Power Plant in the Tehachapi Mountains, but that doesn't mean fossil fuels are fading away quickly. Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

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Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

California just ran on 100% renewable energy, but fossil fuels aren't fading away yet

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Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban gives his an international press conference April 6, days after his FIDESZ party won the parliamentary election, in the Karmelita monastery housing the prime minister's office in Budapest. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images

One man stands between Europe and a ban on Russian oil: Hungary's Viktor Orban

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Adam Farkes and Leo Azevedo of BNRG at a solar energy project in Augusta, Maine. A bigger project planned on the far side of the fence is on hold because of a federal trade investigation. Fred Bever/Maine Public hide caption

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Fred Bever/Maine Public

Solar projects are on hold as U.S. investigates whether China is skirting trade rules

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Lake Charles native James Hiatt looks out across the Devil's Elbow - an off-shoot of the Calcasieu River -toward what could soon be the site of one of nine liquefied natural gas export terminals planned in southwest Louisiana. Halle Parker/WWNO hide caption

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Halle Parker/WWNO

The U.S. may soon export more gas to the EU, but that will complicate climate goals

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Fossil fuels power the Texas economy, accounting for some 14% of gross state product between 2019 and 2020. Now, Texas is the first state in the nation to pass anti-divestment laws for fossil fuels. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Texas stumbles in its effort to punish green financial firms

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Pipes are seen at the gas transmission point in Rembelszczyzna near Warsaw, Poland, on Wednesday. Janek Skarzynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Janek Skarzynski/AFP via Getty Images

Poland's Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki speaks to media at the gas station of Gaz-System in Rembelszczyzna, near Warsaw, Poland, on Wednesday. Polish and Bulgarian leaders accused Moscow of using natural gas to blackmail their countries after Russia's state-controlled energy company stopped supplying the two European nations Wednesday. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

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Czarek Sokolowski/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres during their meeting in the Kremlin, in Moscow, on Tuesday. Vladimir Astapkovich/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Vladimir Astapkovich/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

An incandescent light bulb is seen at Royal Lighting in Los Angeles, on Jan. 21, 2011. The Biden administration is scrapping old-fashioned incandescent light bulbs, speeding an ongoing trend toward more efficient lighting. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP
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The Environmental Cost of Crypto

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Activists demonstrate in front of a ship carrying Russian oil in the Baltic Sea this spring. The U.S. has imposed sanctions on Russian oil. However, most countries have not, and refineries around the world still import Russian oil. Frank Molter/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Frank Molter/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Despite U.S. sanctions, oil traders help Russian oil reach global markets

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Zurich is expanding its district heating system, which delivers hot water and steam through underground pipes. With more buildings relying on this system for heat, there's less demand for natural gas. City of Zurich hide caption

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City of Zurich

To fight climate change, and now Russia, too, Zurich turns off natural gas

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Pipeline used to carry crude oil is shown at the Superior, Wis., terminal of Enbridge Energy, on June 29, 2018. The Biden administration is restoring federal regulations guiding environmental reviews of major infrastructure projects. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

An oil well is seen east of Casper, Wyo., on Feb. 26, 2021. The Biden administration is raising royalty rates that companies must pay for oil and natural gas extracted from federal lands. Mead Gruver/AP hide caption

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Mead Gruver/AP