Energy Energy

Energy

A customer prepares to pump gas into her car at a Shell station on Wednesday in San Rafael, Calif. A surge in gas prices this year is leaving the Biden administration looking for options to do something about it. One that's getting recent attention is tapping the country's emergency oil stockpile. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Motorists fill up their vehicles at a Shell station on July 22 in Denver. Phasing out the sale of gas-powered cars once seemed laughable. It's now inching closer to reality. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

Giving up gas-powered cars was a fringe idea. It's now on its way to reality

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055718914/1057347910" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056878195/1057010671" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A supply ship sits anchored next to the Chevron Corp. Jack/St. Malo deepwater oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico in May 2018. The Biden administration is auctioning millions of acres of the Gulf for oil and gas lease sales. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

This year, the garden produced more than 8,000 pounds of produce, while the panels above generate enough power for 300 local homes. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Siegler/NPR

This Colorado 'solar garden' is literally a farm under solar panels

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054942590/1056082161" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Climate activists demonstrate at the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Friday. Negotiators from almost 200 nations were making a fresh push to reach agreement on a series of key issues. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

Youth climate activists protest on Thursday that representatives of the fossil fuel industry have been allowed inside the venue during the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

The fossil fuel industry turned out in force at COP26. So did climate activists

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055030272/1055030273" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Countries at the COP26 conference in Glasgow pledge to accelerate the transition to 100% new zero-emission vehicle sales. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Machakos, Kenya- Oct 28, 2021. D.Light Territory Sales Executive Stanlas Kisilu installs a solar light outside Winifred Muisyo's home. Khadija Farah for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Khadija Farah for NPR

A wind turbine in front of a steaming coal power plant in Gelsenkirchen, Germany in 2010. New reports find countries' latest promises to cut climate emissions are still not enough to avoid the worst impacts from warming. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Meissner/AP

Participants are in the so-called "action zone" at the UN Climate Change Conference COP26 in Glasgow. Christoph Soeder/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christoph Soeder/Getty Images

A seawall stretches for hundreds of miles along the coast of Guyana, in northern South America. It protects the low-lying coastal lands where the majority of Guyana's population lives. The region is acutely threatened by rising sea levels, as well as other symptoms of climate change, yet Guyana is embracing the oil industry. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Guyana is a poor country that was a green champion. Then Exxon discovered oil

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1051892092/1052774804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a news conference at the U.N. Climate Change Conference COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland, on Tuesday. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

The U.K. considers its 1st new coal mine in decades even as it calls to phase out coal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1051444707/1051926957" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A bulldozer loads coal onto railway wagons at the Jharia coalfield in Dhanbad in India's Jharkhand state. Gautam Dey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gautam Dey/AFP via Getty Images

The Biden administration is proposing new regulations to limit climate-warming methane emissions from oil and gas operations and pipelines. This undated file photo shows the Trans-Alaska pipeline and pump station north of Fairbanks. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Al Grillo/AP

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres speaks during the opening ceremony of the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, on Monday. Alberto Pezzali/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alberto Pezzali/AP

The Asia Vision LNG carrier ship sits docked at the Cheniere Energy Inc. terminal in this aerial photograph taken over Sabine Pass in Texas in 2016. Lindsey Janies/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsey Janies/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Witnesses appear via videoconference during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A coal-hauling truck with 240 tons of coal drives to the surface at the Buckskin Coal Mine in Gillette, Wyo., in 2004. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. coal production is up sharply after hitting a 50-year low last year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1048108267/1048289088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript