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Energy

Plastic piles up at Garten Services in Salem, Oregon. Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

Waste Land

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Chiyomi Endo stands beside her husband's grave. "Remember that this family evacuated Futaba town, Fukushima prefecture," the stone reads, "and moved here due to the nuclear accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011." Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

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Exxon joined the Dow Jones Industrial Average in 1928, as Standard Oil, one of companies descended from John D. Rockefeller's world-transforming oil monopoly. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Tom Rivett-Carnac delivers his TED talk in the woods near his home in the UK. TED hide caption

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TED

Tom Rivett-Carnac: How Can We Shift Our Mindset To Fight Climate Change?

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Darius Rafieyan

Becky, We Hardly Knew Ye

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Extreme heat waves are becoming more common, but California doesn't consider extreme scenarios when planning for summer electricity use. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

Climate Change Lesson From California's Blackouts: Prepare For Extremes

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Lisa Vrooman with her boyfriend John Rock, dog Umar and cat Mochi. They love the high ceilings in their 650-square-foot apartment, but keeping it cool is costly. Lisa Vrooman hide caption

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Lisa Vrooman

Pandemic Electric Bills Are Searing Hot, As Families Stay Home

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The sun sets through smoke created by the Ranch Fire this week in Azusa, Calif. The heat wave will likely hinder firefighting efforts, but at least the strong winds that fuel wildfires are not expected. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Pump jacks work in a field near Lovington, N.M., in 2015. The Trump administration is lifting an Obama-era rule aimed at limiting emissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Trump's Methane Rollback That Big Oil Doesn't Want

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Carlos Becerra/Getty Images

Coronavirus Comes To Venezuela

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Rattan Lal, an Indian-born scientist, has devoted his career to finding ways to capture carbon from the air and store it in soil. Ken Chamberlain/OSU/CFAES hide caption

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Ken Chamberlain/OSU/CFAES

A Prophet Of Soil Gets His Moment Of Fame

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Amy Holditch settles in behind the wheel of the RV she rented for her 10-day family trip from Madison, Ala. to Cape Cod, Mass. Russell Lewis/NPR hide caption

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Russell Lewis/NPR

Not Flying This Summer? Many Americans Are Hitting The Road — In RVs

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Not your grandmother's nuclear reactor. A drawing of Oklo's proposed Aurora nuclear power plant, which would produce enough electricity for about 1000 homes. Oklo hide caption

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Oklo

Smaller Nuclear Plants May Come With Less Stringent Safety Rules

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British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell, Jeffrey Epstein's former girlfriend, is pictured in 1991. She now faces multiple counts related to sex trafficking of minors and perjury. She has pleaded not guilty. Jim James/AP hide caption

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Jim James/AP

West Atlanta resident Harriet Feggins has been out of work since March because of the pandemic. So far she has managed to pay her electric bill by scraping together odd jobs and dipping into her 401(k). "I'm trying to do everything I can," she says, but she worries it won't be enough. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

'Tidal Wave' Of Power Shut-Offs Looms As Nation Grapples With Heat

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Pump jacks operate at dusk near Loco Hills in Eddy County, New Mexico, on April 23. U.S. oil producers are grappling with prolonged low oil prices and the uncertainty created by the coronavirus pandemic. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

Oil Industry, Accustomed To Booms And Busts, Is Rocked By Pandemic

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President Trump proposes changes to the National Environmental Policy Act at the White House in January. The final rules aims to speed approval of pipelines and other infrastructure. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Sunset near a protest camp outside of the Lakota Sioux reservation of Standing Rock, North Dakota, in December 2016. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images