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Energy

The Blue Lake Rancheria microgrid powers a number of buildings on the reservation and helped provide necessary energy during county-wide power outages. Courtesy of the Blue Lake Rancheria hide caption

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Courtesy of the Blue Lake Rancheria

California Reservation's Solar Microgrid Provides Power During Utility Shutoffs

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Jack George, an employee at Royal Lighting, looks at chandeliers using incandescent light bulbs at the store in Los Angeles. A federal judge is allowing California to enforce updated efficiency standards that will affect such specialty lightbulbs. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A fallen PG&E utility pole lays on a property burned during a wildfire. The company has several settlement deals meant to clear liabilities stemming from fires sparked by its equipment. Philip Pacheco/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Pacheco/AFP via Getty Images

The Monastery of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Washington, D.C. is the new host of a 151 kW community solar garden. The panels will provide roughly 50 nearby households with green energy. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

Environmental activists rally outside of New York Supreme Court in October in Manhattan, the first day of the trial accusing ExxonMobil of misleading shareholders about its climate change accounting. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Exxon Wins New York Climate Change Fraud Case

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The sun sets over the dark Manhattan skyline on August 14, 2003. A power outage affected large parts of the northeastern United States and Canada. Robert Giroux/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Giroux/Getty Images

Protesters demonstrate against Exxon Mobil in New York City in October. New York state's attorney general alleged that the company misled its investors by lying about the potential impacts of climate regulation on its bottom line. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Corbis via Getty Images

Peter Melnik, a fourth-generation dairy farmer, owns Bar-Way Farm, Inc. in Deerfield, Mass. He has an anaerobic digester on his farm that converts food waste into renewable energy. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Chew On This: Farmers Are Using Food Waste To Make Electricity

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Jeff Anderson worked at the LEDVANCE lightbulb factory in St. Marys for more than 20 years. He is considering a career change to heavy equipment operator. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Lighting Industry's Future Dims As Efficient LED Bulbs Take Over

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Oil prices are down amid weak demand, and investors no longer seem willing to write the industry a blank check. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As Oil Prices Drop And Money Dries Up, Is The U.S. Shale Boom Going Bust?

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Gov. Gavin Newsom tours the Chevron oil field west of Bakersfield, where a spill of more than 800,000 gallons flowed into a dry creek bed in McKittrick, Calif. in July 2019. Irfan Khan/AP hide caption

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Irfan Khan/AP

Kevin Ross, president of the Scottish Plastics and Rubber Association, in front of the INEOS Grangemouth refinery and chemical plant. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

A child plays near communist-era apartment blocks in Hoyerswerda, Germany. After the collapse of the communist East German government that had redeveloped the area into an industrial hub, factories shut down and coal production declined. The population has sunk below 33,000 — about half its size before the fall of the Berlin Wall. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

In German Coal Country, This Former Socialist Model City Has Shrunk In Half

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Bob Murray at the St. Clairsville, Ohio, headquarters of Murray Energy, which has declared bankruptcy. The coal executive pushed the Trump administration to roll back environmental regulations. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Despite Bankruptcy And Illness, Bob Murray Remains A Loud Voice For Coal

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Coal ash swirls on the surface of the Dan River following one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history into the river in Danville, Va., in February 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency wants to ease restrictions on coal ash and wastewater from coal plants. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP