Energy Energy

Energy

A pumpjack operates in the desert oil fields in southern Bahrain on April 22, 2020. Bahrain and other members of the OPEC+ alliance decided Thursday to keep output largely unchanged as they hope to push crude prices even higher after a recent rally. Mazen Mahdi/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mazen Mahdi/AFP via Getty Images

Water for flushing toilets was being distributed at seven sites in Mississippi's capital city — more than 10 days after winter storms wreaked havoc on the city's water system because the system is still struggling to maintain consistent water pressure, authorities said. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

"As Texans struggled to survive this winter storm, Griddy made the suffering even worse as it debited outrageous amounts each day," Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said as his office sued the company. Here, electrical lines run through a neighborhood in Austin during the recent winter storms. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A worker fixes a water pipe in Galveston, Texas, on Feb. 19. The power is back on in much of the state, but the Lone Star State now faces the hefty cost of emerging from its devastating storms. Thomas Shea/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Shea/AFP via Getty Images

The Power Is Back On In Texas. Now Comes The Recovery, And It Won't Be Cheap

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Jennifer Granholm is sworn in as energy secretary Thursday. Granholm told NPR that pivoting to a clean energy economy could ensure a dependable grid and help create jobs. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Energy Secretary Granholm: Texas Outages Show Need For Changes To U.S. Power Systems

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A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

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Five out-of-state members of a major Texas electricity grid operator are resigning following winter storm Uri that hit the state and knocked out coal, natural gas and nuclear plants that were unprepared for the freezing temperatures brought on by the storm. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., during her Senate hearing Tuesday to be Interior Secretary. If confirmed, she would be the first Native American to hold the post. Jim Watson/AP hide caption

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Jim Watson/AP

Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

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Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

A lower-carbon natural gas flame burns on a stovetop at a NW Natural testing facility. Cassandra Profita/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Cassandra Profita/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Natural Gas Companies Have Their Own Plans To Go Low-Carbon

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Pike Electric service trucks line up after a snowstorm on Tuesday in Fort Worth, Texas. Millions across the state have been without power, water or both, following historic low temperatures brought by winter weather. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Texas Is Defined By Energy. How Did The State's Power Grid Fail So Massively?

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Snow covers the ground in Waco, Texas, on Feb. 17. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has blamed renewable energy sources for the blackouts that have hit the state. In fact, they were caused by a systemwide failure across all energy sources. Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images

No, The Blackouts In Texas Weren't Caused By Renewables. Here's What Really Happened

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Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, looks on prior to a game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at AT&T Stadium on Nov. 8, 2020, in Arlington, Texas. An oil company in which he is the majority shareholder said it had hit the "jackpot" as natural gas prices surged during the winter storms. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Patrons sit in a restaurant without power caused by cold weather blackouts on Tuesday in Richardson, Texas. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Rolling Blackouts Are Anything But, Mayor Says

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In Wyoming, public schools such as Pinedale's middle school, face significant cuts to their budgets due to slumping oil, gas and coal prices. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Facing A Reckoning, Wyoming Wrestles With A Transition From Fossil Fuels

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SpaceX owner and Tesla CEO Elon Musk is funding a $100 million competition to find innovative ways to remove carbon from the air or water. He's seen here at an awards show last December. Britta Pedersen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Britta Pedersen/AFP via Getty Images