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Tourists visit Mount Rushmore National Monument on Wednesday. President Trump is expected to visit the federal monument in South Dakota and give a speech before a fireworks display on Friday. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, pictured on June 3, is leading a lawsuit against Exxon Mobil, Koch Industries and the American Petroleum Institute. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Minnesota Attorney General Sues Exxon Over Climate Change

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Crew members shovel pollock onboard a trawler on the Bering Sea. The fishing industry has been hit by COVID-19, but the federal agency that manages it has banned mention of the pandemic without preapproval. Nat Herz/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Nat Herz/Alaska's Energy Desk

The Freightliner eCascadia and the eM2 are two of the first electric semitrucks to hit the highways for test-driving. Courtesy of Daimler Trucks North America hide caption

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Courtesy of Daimler Trucks North America
TED

Suzanne Simard: How Do Trees Collaborate?

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A massive cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert is arriving along the U.S. Gulf Coast this week after traveling across the Atlantic Ocean. The dust will move over the Southeastern United States after reaching the U.S. shore. NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/GOES-East hide caption

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NOAA/NESDIS/STAR/GOES-East

Saharan Dust Cloud Arrives At The U.S. Gulf Coast, Bringing Haze

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Bayer says a settlement worth more than $10 billion will resolve most of the roughly 125,000 claims the company currently faces over its Roundup product. Here, a farmer sprays the glyphosate herbicide in northwestern France in September. Jean-François Monier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jean-François Monier/AFP via Getty Images

Rattan Lal in an Ohio cornfield. The soil scientist is this year's World Food Laureate, earning a quarter of a million dollar prize for his pioneering work in soil improvement. Ken Chamberlain/Ohio State University hide caption

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Ken Chamberlain/Ohio State University

The closer humans are to animals, the greater the opportunity for zoonotic spillover, where a pathogen jumps from animal to human. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

Osprey looking for alewives along the Sebasticook River in Maine. The removal of two dams has allowed migratory fish to return. Murray Carpenter hide caption

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Murray Carpenter

'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down

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George Monbiot: How Does This Moment Call For A "Great Reset"?

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Daniel Wood/NPR

Minneapolis Has A Bold Plan To Tackle Racial Inequity. Now It Has To Follow Through

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Marine biologist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson speaks on stage during the 2019 NYC Climate Strike rally and demonstration at Battery Park. Ron Adar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Adar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

An artist's interpretation of a baby mosasaur hatching from an egg in the Antarctic sea. Francisco Hueichaleo hide caption

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Francisco Hueichaleo

Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

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President Barack Obama signs the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2009, in Denver. Gerald Herbert/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

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Looking west from this overlook in the George Washington National Forest in central Virginia, the pathway of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline would be visible along the valley floor running to the north. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Hurricane Irma sends a storm surge crashing over a seawall at the mouth of the Miami River in Florida. The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a network of more sea walls, gates and other barriers to protect the Miami waterfront from storms and hurricanes. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Sea otters are tourist magnets--and voracious eaters. Not everyone is happy about their comeback off the coast of British Columbia. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

What Happens When Sea Otters Eat 15 Pounds of Shellfish A Day

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