Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Seeds are seen as students at Eucalyptus Elementary School in in Hawthorne, Calif., learn to plant a vegetable garden on March 13, 2019. The U.S. supply of native seeds is currently too low to respond to climate change-related events, a new report finds. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

Of the many species the scientists photographed aboard the RV Investigator, the deep-sea batfish made one of the biggest splashes across social media. Benjamin Healley / Museums Victoria hide caption

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Benjamin Healley / Museums Victoria

Scientists discover fantastical creatures deep in the Indian Ocean

Yi-Kai Tea, a biodiversity research fellow at the Australian Museum in Sydney, has amassed a social media following as @KaiTheFishGuy for his sassy writing and gorgeous photos of fish and other wildlife.

Scientists discover fantastical creatures deep in the Indian Ocean

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This 1990 aerial file photo shows a section of the Tongass National Forest in Alaska that has patches of bare land where clear-cutting has occurred. The federal government plans to reinstate restrictions on road-building and logging on the country's largest national forest. Hall Anderson/Ketchikan Daily News via AP, File hide caption

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Hall Anderson/Ketchikan Daily News via AP, File

ICARDA lab employee Bilal Inaty cuts a lentil plant in order to test it for various diseases at the ICARDA research station in the village of Terbol in Lebanon's Bekaa valley, on Dec. 21, 2022. Dalia Khamissy for NPR hide caption

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Dalia Khamissy for NPR

How ancient seeds from the Fertile Crescent could help save us from climate change

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New guidance calls for lower lead levels in food for babies and children under 2. Lead exposure can be harmful to developing brains. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty

The FDA proposes new targets to limit lead in baby food

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Wind turbines, of the Block Island Wind Farm, tower over the water on October 14, 2016 off the shores of Block Island, Rhode Island. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Biden's offshore wind plan could create thousands of jobs, but challenges remain

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Grey kangaroos feed on grass near Canberra, Australia, March 15, 2008. A bill that would ban the sale of kangaroo parts has been introduced in the Oregon Legislature, taking aim at sports apparel manufacturers that use leather from the animals to make their products. Mark Graham/AP hide caption

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Mark Graham/AP

Boats are pushed up on a causeway after Hurricane Ian passed through the area on September 29, 2022 in Fort Myers, Florida. Research suggests support for some climate policies increases immediately after climate-driven disasters such as Ian. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In this Sept. 20, 2017 file photo, electricity poles and lines lie toppled on the road after Hurricane Maria hit the eastern region of the island in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Skiers cruise down the slopes at Snowmass ski area in Colorado. This winter has already delivered snow totals above 130% of average, but climate scientists say it will take more than one wet winter to pull the arid West out of a 23-year drought. Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

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Alex Hager/KUNC

Why heavy winter rain and snow won't be enough to pull the West out of a megadrought

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An interview with a federal official set off a culture war fight after he suggested regulators might put stricter scrutiny on gas cooking stoves due to health concerns. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

A display of Starbucks coffee pods at a Costco Warehouse in Pennsylvania. A recent article says using coffee pods might be better for the climate, but the science is far from settled. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Yeah, actually, your plastic coffee pod may not be great for the climate

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Harold Davis, who's 29 years old, bought this truck and snowplow in the fall. Opportunities to use his new plow have been few and far between. Mara Hoplamazian/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Mara Hoplamazian/New Hampshire Public Radio

This snowplow driver just started his own service. But warmer winters threaten it

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Kylee Gray, a ranger with the Queensland Department of Environment and Science, holds a giant cane toad on Jan. 12 near Airlie Beach, Australia. The toad weighed 5.95 pounds. Queensland Department of Environment and Science via AP hide caption

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Queensland Department of Environment and Science via AP

Sibley Street, along with other residential roads were closed due to flooding from recent rain storms resulting in high water levels in Willow Creek, in Folsom, California. Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources hide caption

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Kenneth James/California Department of Water Resources

California's flooding reveals we're still building cities for the climate of the past

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In this June 15, 2014, photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, a polar bear dries off after taking a swim in the Chukchi Sea in Alaska. A polar bear has attacked and killed two people in a remote village in western Alaska, according to state troopers who said they received the report of the attack on Tuesday. Brian Battaile/U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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Brian Battaile/U.S. Geological Survey via AP

The Colorado River is imperiled, parched by droughts exacerbated by climate change. According to a 2017 study, waterflow could drop 30% by 2050 and 55% by 2100 due to greenhouse gas emissions. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The/Denver Post via Getty Images

A course correction in managing drying rivers

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Photographs by Becky Harlan/NPR; Matteo De Stefano/Getty Images; pixelfit/Getty Images; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

5 New Year's resolutions to reduce your carbon footprint

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Lelac Almagor and two of her children take NPR's Adam Bearne for a ride in their e-cargo bike. Eric Bourland hide caption

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Eric Bourland

EVs are expensive. These city commuters ditched cars altogether — for e-bikes

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