Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

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Michael Regan speaks during his confirmation hearing in February to be the Environmental Protection Agency administrator. In an NPR interview Thursday, Regan says technology that helps eliminate emissions is key to tackling climate change. Caroline Brehman/AP hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/AP

EPA Chief Says Biden Infrastructure Bill Will Help The U.S. Face Climate Change

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Voters stand in line to cast ballots Tuesday for Greenland's parliamentary elections at a polling station in the capital. Emil Helms/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Emil Helms/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

A pedestrian using an umbrella to get some relief from the sun walks past a sign displaying the temperature on June 20, 2017, in Phoenix. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

Your Weather Forecast Update: Warmer Climate Will Be The New 'Normal'

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Visitors gather to watch the sunrise under blooming Japanese cherry blossom trees along the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., on March 30. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

What The Cherry Blossom Bloom Can Tell Us About Climate Change

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks with other Democratic members of Congress outside of the Democratic National Headquarters in November, urging then-President-elect Biden to address the climate crisis. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Ocasio-Cortez Sees Green New Deal Progress In Biden Plan, But 'It's Not Enough'

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More than 50 million people in the United States suffer from allergies. Arterra/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Arterra/Universal Images Group via Getty

Micro Wave: Are Seasonal Allergies Getting Worse?

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U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg speaks to Amtrak employees Feb. 5 during a visit at Union Station in Washington, D.C. In a Thursday interview with NPR's Morning Edition, he said not making infrastructure investment would be a "threat to American competitiveness." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Buttigieg Says $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan Is A 'Common Sense Investment'

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Purple sea urchins have boomed off Northern California, destroying kelp forests that provide a crucial ecosystem. Steve Lonhart / NOAA MBNMS hide caption

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Steve Lonhart / NOAA MBNMS

In Hotter Climate, 'Zombie' Urchins Are Winning And Kelp Forests Are Losing

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Workers improve a busy highway intersection in Miami. President Biden is proposing roughly $2 trillion to invest in the nation's infrastructure. His plan includes improvements for roads, bridges, transit, water systems, electric grids and Internet access. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Aerial view of AJAX Glacier and O'Connor rock in the area near Comandante Ferraz Station, in King George Island, Antarctica. Alessandro Dahan/Getty Images hide caption

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Alessandro Dahan/Getty Images

What We Can Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica

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Three of Deepwater Wind's turbines stand off Block Island, R.I., in 2016. The Biden administration is pushing for a sharp increase in offshore wind energy development along the East Coast. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Marine biology student Ranim Tahhan, 21, pictured left, and another volunteer work to clean Tyre beach from the pollution caused by an oil spill in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Sherlock/NPR

Lava flows down from the crater of Mount Merapi, Indonesia's most active volcano, as seen from Tunggul Arum in the city of Turi near Yogyakarta early Saturday. Agung Supriyanto/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Agung Supriyanto/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. bald eagle populations have more than quadrupled in the lower 48 states since 2009, according to a new survey from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Adult periodical cicadas in Reston, Virginia on May 16, 2004 Richard Ellis/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Ellis/Getty Images

Glacier mice in Iceland. Ruth Mottram/Ruth Mottram hide caption

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Ruth Mottram/Ruth Mottram

Meet The 'Glacier Mice'

(Encore episode.) In 2006, while hiking around the Root Glacier in Alaska, glaciologist Tim Bartholomaus encountered something strange and unexpected on the ice — dozens of fuzzy, green moss balls. It turns out, other glaciologists had come across glacial moss balls before and lovingly called them "glacier mice."

Meet The 'Glacier Mice'

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Curtis Wynn, president and CEO of Roanoke Electric Cooperative, with a bi-directional charger that can use electricity from an electric vehicle's battery to power a building. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

How A New Deal Legacy Is Building Clean Energy In Rural North Carolina

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A thin strip of sand is all that stands between multimillion-dollar homes on the Southern California coast and a rising Pacific Ocean. A state bill aims to buy, then rent out such properties until they're no longer habitable. Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images

California Has A New Idea For Homes At Risk From Rising Seas: Buy, Rent, Retreat

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Deb Haaland, who made history this week by becoming the first indigenous interior secretary, promised to begin repairing a legacy of abuses committed by the federal government toward tribes. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Celebration Over, Deb Haaland Now Faces A Long To-Do List At Interior

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Courtesy of TED Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED

Ariel Waldman: What Can We Learn From Microscopic Life In Antarctica?

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Christian Richard stands next to a groundwater well on his southwestern Louisiana farm. A centuries-old law allows landowners in the state to use as much water as they want for free. Austin R. Ramsey/IRW hide caption

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Austin R. Ramsey/IRW

Known For Its Floods, Louisiana Is Running Dangerously Short Of Groundwater

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