Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Groups representing dozens of U.S. tribes are among those to ask the U.S. to place wolves back on the endangered species list. Here, a gray wolf is shown at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn., in 2017. Dawn Villella/AP hide caption

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Dawn Villella/AP

Steam rises from the Miller coal power plant in Adamsville, Ala., in April. An industry group says a climate plan in Congress would shut down all U.S. coal plants by 2030 or earlier. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Commuters walk into a flooded subway station and disrupted service due to extremely heavy rainfall from the remnants of Hurricane Ida on September 2, 2021. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Climate Change Means More Subway Floods; How Cities Are Adapting

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An artist's impression of a woolly mammoth in a snow-covered environment. Leonello Calvetti/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images/Stocktrek Images hide caption

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Leonello Calvetti/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images/Stocktrek Images

For a forthcoming study, researchers with the U.K.'s University of Bath and other schools spoke to 10,000 people in 10 countries, all of whom were between the ages of 16 and 25, to gauge how they feel about climate change. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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FG Trade/Getty Images

Climate activists in Quezon City, Philippines, light candles and hold LED-illuminated banners in December of last year to commemorates five years since the Paris Agreement and to call for an end to the killing of environmental defenders. Aileen Dimatatac/Majority World/Universal Images via Getty hide caption

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Aileen Dimatatac/Majority World/Universal Images via Getty

Taco Bell wants customers to collect its sauce packets so they can be turned into other products rather than sent to the landfill. Joshua Blanchard/Getty Images for Taco Bell hide caption

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Joshua Blanchard/Getty Images for Taco Bell

Pope Francis, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Portal Welby and Archbishop of Constantinople and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, shown at a meeting of prayer in the Basilica of St. Francis in 2016, are asking for climate action. Vatican pool photo/Getty Images hide caption

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Vatican pool photo/Getty Images

Workers clean a gas station damaged by the remnants of Hurricane Ida in New York City. Scientists warn that 60% of world oil reserves need to stay underground to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

Jason Marone cools down a hot spot burning close to homes last week in the Christmas Valley area of Meyers, Calif. Karl Mondon/Digital First Media/The Mercury News via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Mondon/Digital First Media/The Mercury News via Getty Images

Firefighters from the Cosumnes Fire Department carry water hoses last week while holding a fire line to keep the Caldor Fire from spreading in South Lake Tahoe, Calif. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Climate change is increasingly becoming a public health threat, experts warn. Thousands were displaced and dozens died during Hurricane Ida. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Climate Change Is The Greatest Threat To Public Health, Top Medical Journals Warn

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This image provided by NOAA taken Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2021 and reviewed by The Associated Press shows oil slicks at the flooded Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery in Belle Chasse, La. It's just one of the oil spills being looked into in the Gulf region in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida. AP hide caption

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AP