Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

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Why wolves are thriving in this radioactive zone

In 1986 the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, releasing radioactive material into northern Ukraine and Belarus. It was the most serious nuclear accident in history. Over one hundred thousand people were evacuated from the surrounding area. But local gray wolves never left — and their population has grown over the years. It's seven times denser than populations in protected lands elsewhere in Belarus. This fact has led scientists to wonder whether the wolves are genetically either resistant or resilient to cancer — or if the wolves are simply thriving because humans aren't interfering with them.

Why wolves are thriving in this radioactive zone

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COP28 President Sultan Ahmed al-Jaber attends the opening session of the climate conference. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Big Oil Leads at COP28

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Pope Francis attends the welcoming ceremony of World Youth Day (WYD) in Lisbon on August 3, 2023. Pope Francis urged young people to focus on caring for the planet and fighting climate change, calling for an "integral ecology" that melds environmental protection with the fight against poverty and other social problems. Patricia de Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patricia de Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images

A member of the emergency services walks near a crack cutting across the main road in Grindavik, Iceland following recent earthquakes. The southwestern town was evacuated early Saturday after magma shifting under the Earth's crust caused hundreds of earthquakes that experts warned could be a precursor to a volcanic eruption. Kjartan Torbjoernsson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kjartan Torbjoernsson/AFP via Getty Images

Research has found that trees contribute to the formation of clouds, which reflect heat from the sun and cool the atmosphere in the immediate area. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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To figure out the future climate, scientists are researching how trees form clouds

If you've ever looked up at the clouds and wondered where they came from, you're not alone. Atmospheric researcher Lubna Dada is fascinated by the mystery of how clouds form and what role they play in our climate. Today, host Aaron Scott talks to Dada about a recent study on the role of trees in cloud formation, and how this data will improve our current climate models.

To figure out the future climate, scientists are researching how trees form clouds

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Cut down your household waste with these 5 creative solutions

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