Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Chris and Nancy Brown embrace Monday while looking over the remains of their burned residence after the Camp Fire tore through the region in Paradise, Calif. Dozens of people have been killed in the latest fires to hit the state. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

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Keystone XL pipeline sections sit on a train near Glendive, Mont. Nate Hegyi/Yellowstone Public Radio hide caption

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Nate Hegyi/Yellowstone Public Radio

As Construction Of Keystone XL Is Paused, Tribes Brace For What's Next

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Shawnee Rae, age 8, among a group of Native American activists from the Sisseton-Wahpeton tribe protesting the Keystone XL Pipeline in Watertown, S.D. in 2015. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Swordfish like this one, sunning itself off the coast of Ventura, Calif. have traditionally been caught in drift gillnets. But ocean activists say the method is unsustainable because it captures too many other sea creatures. Douglas Klug/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Klug/Getty Images

Kristy Taylor baits her hook while fishing on the Two Hearted River in Michigan. She's part of a steelhead fishing class put on by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources in an effort to inspire more women to fish. Morgan Springer/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

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Morgan Springer/Interlochen Public Radio

Luring More Women To Fishing In The Upper Great Lakes

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Rancher Dave Creveling believes the cost of a new Washington state carbon fee would be passed along to rural people like him if voters approve it. Ashley Ahearn for NPR hide caption

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Ashley Ahearn for NPR

Washington State Could Become The First To Charge A Carbon Fee

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One of the BillerudKorsnäs packaging redesign projects replaced the plastic casing around camping gear with cardboard. Cassandra Profita/OPB hide caption

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Cassandra Profita/OPB

Beyond Plastic Bans: Creating Products To Replace It

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In New Mexico, an elected Land Commissioner oversees oil and gas leases on millions of acres of state land. The race is drawing big money from fossil fuel interests and environmental groups. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Why Big Money Is Being Pumped Into A Small New Mexico Race

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Butterflies swarm a flowering plant at the National Butterfly Center, a 100-acre wildlife center and botanical garden in Hidalgo County, Texas. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A year after Hurricane Maria touched down in September 2017, the island is still recovering. On Tuesday lawyers for the government admitted they had not yet overhauled the island's emergency response plans for the next major hurricane. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Angel Valentin/Getty Images

Listen: Court Hearing

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