Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Football players at Cedar Grove High School in DeKalb County start practice in late July without pads to give them an acclimatization period to get used to the heat. This is a statewide rule from the Georgia High School Association. Matthew Pearson/WABE hide caption

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Matthew Pearson/WABE

How Georgia reduced heat-related high school football deaths

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The Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine's Enerhodar, Zaporizhzhia region, is seen through barbed wire on the embankment in Nikopol, Dnipropetrovsk region, central Ukraine, on July 20. Russian soldiers have been shelling Nikopol from the premises of the nuclear power plant. Dmytro Smolyenko/Future Publishing via Getty Images hide caption

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Dmytro Smolyenko/Future Publishing via Getty Images

Over the river from a Russian-occupied nuclear plant, a Ukrainian town fears a spill

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Elephants at a water pan in Hwange National Park in north western Zimbabwe. The sanctuary has a capacity for 15,000 elephants, but it currently hosts more than 45,000 according to ZimParks, the country's wildlife management authority. Tendai Marima for NPR hide caption

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Tendai Marima for NPR

Blacktail Deer Creek in Yellowstone National Park, seen here in a 2019 photo from the ecological study known as NEON, is one site where researchers have bubbled sulfur hexafluoride into the water. NEON hide caption

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NEON

Why scientists have pumped a potent greenhouse gas into streams on public lands

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Levi Draheim has spent half his life involved in climate change litigation aimed at holding federal and state leaders accountable on fossil fuels. Robin Loznak/Our Children's Trust hide caption

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Robin Loznak/Our Children's Trust

Grape vines at Korbel vineyards are submerged under floodwater Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, near Guerneville, Calif. The Central Valley produces $17 billion worth of crops every year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

This photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, a carrier of Lyme disease. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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James Gathany/AP

Tick Check! The Tiny Bloodsuckers In Our Backyards

Short Wave is going outside every Friday this summer! In this second episode of our series on the National Parks System, we head to Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas. Among the trees and trails, researchers like Adela Oliva Chavez search for blacklegged ticks that could carry Lyme disease. She's looking for answers as to why tick-borne illnesses like Lyme disease are spreading in some parts of the country and not others. Today: What Adela's research tells us about ticks and the diseases they carry, and why she's dedicated her career to understanding what makes these little critters... tick.

Tick Check! The Tiny Bloodsuckers In Our Backyards

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WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 7: Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) gives the thumbs up as he leaves the Senate Chamber after passage of the Inflation Reduction Act at the U.S. Capitol August 7, 2022 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Inflation Reduction Act includes tax credits for residential solar and battery storage systems, along with other measures aimed at encouraging individuals to cut their carbon emissions. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

3 ways the Inflation Reduction Act would pay you to help fight climate change

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The Beluga whale swims in the lock of Notre Dame de la Garenne in Saint-Pierre-la-Garenne, west of Paris, France, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022. During Wednesday's rescue operation, the dangerously thin animal began to have breathing difficulties, and experts decided the most humane thing to do was to euthanize the creature. Aurelien Morissard/AP hide caption

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Aurelien Morissard/AP

Since May, authorities have now uncovered four sets of human remains at Lake Mead, as the country's largest reservoir deals with extremely low water levels. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images