Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

A dolphin's sense of echolocation allows it to coordinate efforts to hunt prey, see "through" other creatures and form three-dimensional shapes using sound. Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images

The human sensory experience is limited. Journey into the world that animals know

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Minerva Contreras, 44, connects climate change to her health because she has a lung problem that makes it harder to breathe on hot days. Keeping her house near Bakersfield, Calif., cool costs as much as $800 a month in the summer. Molly Peterson/KVPR hide caption

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Molly Peterson/KVPR

Americans connect extreme heat and climate change to their health, a survey finds

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In this image taken from video from Bakhtar State News Agency, Taliban fighters secure a government helicopter to evacuate injured people in Gayan district, Paktika province, Afghanistan, Wednesday, June 22, 2022. Bakhtar State News Agency via AP hide caption

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Bakhtar State News Agency via AP

More than 900 people have reportedly been killed in an earthquake in Afghanistan

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Carlos and Jessica Deviana sit in the back of their father's SUV, which they were using as a bedroom after Hurricane Michael destroyed their home in Panama City, Fla., in October 2018. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

You've likely been affected by climate change. Your long-term finances might be, too

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Bison graze at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming in 2019. Grand Teton National Park is located near Yellowstone and remains fully open as an alternate travel destination while Yellowstone works to recover from flooding. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named Bøkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway. Baac3nes/Getty Images hide caption

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Baac3nes/Getty Images

A plume of smoke from the Black Fire rises over the Gila National Forest. Philip Connors watched the fire grow and creep closer to his fire lookout post. Philip Connors/Philip Connors hide caption

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Philip Connors/Philip Connors

A New Mexico firewatcher describes watching his world burn

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Images of British journalist Dom Phillips (left) and Indigenous affairs expert Bruno Pereira are seen on a sign presented by employees of Brazil's national Indigenous agency, FUNAI, during a vigil in Brasilia, Brazil, on June 9. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

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Annick Press

A female bear and two 1-year-old cubs walk over snow-covered freshwater glacier ice in Southeast Greenland. Kristin Laidre hide caption

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Kristin Laidre

In a place with little sea ice, polar bears have found another way to hunt

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Kansas officials say weather conditions made it hard for cows to cool down in an intense heat wave. Here, cattle graze near wind turbines in Hays, Kansas, in 2017. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

High water levels in the Lamar River eroding the Northeast Entrance Road. National Park Service hide caption

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National Park Service

Yellowstone-area floods strand visitors and residents, prompt evacuations

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