Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

A late Triassic-era rausuchian, one of the rival reptile lineages who lost out to the dinosaurs. Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons

Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the nation, has shrunk so low there's concern the Hoover Dam will soon be unable to generate hydropower. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Where the Colorado River crisis is hitting home

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Charles F. "Chuck" Sams III is the first Native American director of the National Park Service. He's working to facilitate US government collaboration with tribes on managing public lands. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

In the final episode of Short Wave's Summer Road Trip series exploring the science happening in national parks and public lands, Aaron talks to National Park Service Director Charles Sams, who recently issued new policy guidance to strengthen the ways the park service collaborates with American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes, the Native Hawaiian Community, and other indigenous peoples. It's part of a push across the federal government to increase the level of tribal co-stewardship over public lands. Aaron talks with Sams, the first Tribal citizen to head the agency, about how he hopes this will change the way parks are managed, how the parks are already incorporating Traditional Ecological Knowledge, and what national parkland meant to him growing up as a member of the Cayuse and Walla Walla tribes on the Umatilla Indian Reservation in eastern Oregon.

Working With Tribes To Co-Steward National Parks

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In this photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, yellow crazy ants are seen in a bait testing efficacy trial at the Johnston Atoll National Wildlife Refuge in December, 2015. An invasive species known as the yellow crazy ant has been eradicated from the remote U.S. atoll in the Pacific. Robert Peck/AP hide caption

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Robert Peck/AP

In October 2016, in Kigali, Rwanda, nations around the globe agreed to phase out a category of dangerous greenhouse gases widely used in refrigerators and air conditioners. In 2022, the U.S. took steps to formally ratify the agreement. Cyril Ndegeya/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cyril Ndegeya/AFP via Getty Images

Hurricane Fiona, which made landfall on Sunday, has damaged reservoirs and water filtration plants. Puerto Rico's only water agency is scrambling to restore services, but officials say they're waiting for flooded rivers to subside. Alejandro Granadillo/AP hide caption

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Alejandro Granadillo/AP