Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt announcing his decision in April to scrap Obama administration fuel economy standards. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mike Stone, left, and Andy Sherman in the pumping station for Hannibal, Mo., during a flood in 1993. The city has since constructed a flood wall, and flood managers have built up levees to protect against flooding. But scientists warn those structures are making flooding worse. Cliff Schiappa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cliff Schiappa/AP

California Game Warden Pat Freeling replants stolen succulents along the Mendocino coastline. Courtesy of Pat Freeling hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Pat Freeling

The Case Of The Stolen Succulents

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611570479/612859132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The USDA has released several options for what the labels might look like. Department of Agriculture hide caption

toggle caption
Department of Agriculture

USDA Unveils Prototypes For GMO Food Labels, And They're ... Confusing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612063389/612584007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image provided by NOAA shows the hole in the ozone layer in 2015. NOAA scientists now say emissions of one ozone-depleting chemical appear to be rising, even though the chemical has been banned and reported production has essentially been at zero for years. NOAA via AP hide caption

toggle caption
NOAA via AP

Austin Steeves packages lobsters after hauling traps on his grandfather's boat in Casco Bay, Portland, Maine. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Warming Waters Push Fish To Cooler Climes, Out Of Some Fishermen's Reach

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611716731/611869669" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows sulfur dioxide plumes rising from Kilauea's fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck, viewed from a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, arrives for his testimony Wednesday before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

How Those Affected By Hawaii's Volcano Eruption Are Coping

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611389682/611389683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Florida's coral reefs, already bleached by years of warming ocean waters, are being further battered by a mysterious disease. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hide caption

toggle caption
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Battered By Bleaching, Florida's Coral Reefs Now Face Mysterious Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611258056/613117661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Louisiana wants to divert parts of the Mississippi River, using its sediment to build up shrinking marshes. Planners are using this new model to test how it would work. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Lux/WWNO

Louisiana Wants To Use The Muddy Mississippi To Build Up Its Coast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610957843/611199751" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientific Debate Centers On Giant Crack In Africa's Rift Valley

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610905314/610905315" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump speaking at the "Unleashing American Energy" event at the Department of Energy in June 2017. Trump said he wants to reorient toward "American energy dominance." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Lava flows at a lava fissure in the aftermath of eruptions from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island. The U.S. Geological Survey said a recent lowering of the lava lake at the volcano's Halemaumau crater has raised the potential for explosive eruptions at the volcano. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

How 1 Hawaii Resident Is Documenting The Kilauea Volcano Eruption

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610777726/610777727" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hawaii's Big Island Braces For More Eruptions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610716310/610716311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Orleans Pressured To Reconsider Permit For Power Plant Backed By Paid Actors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610716331/610716332" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eruption Of Hawaii Volcano Could Cause Smog, Acid Rain And Ballistic Projectiles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610529510/610529511" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An infrared satellite image shows Hurricane Harvey just prior to making landfall on Aug. 25, 2017. Warm water in the Gulf of Mexico fed heavy rains, according to new research. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images