Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Rod Williams, a Purdue University associate professor, holds a hellbender that he and a team of students collected in southern Indiana's Blue River in 2014. The Eastern hellbender salamander is set to be Pennsylvania's official state amphibian. Rick Callahan/AP hide caption

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Rick Callahan/AP

Activists call for government action on climate change in the middle of Oxford Circus on Wednesday in London. Now in their third day of action, protests have blocked a number of key junctions in central London. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

Paradise Irrigation District manager Kevin Phillips shows a sample of the town's water pipes, which were frequently woven between underground root systems that were likely burned during the fire. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Paradise, Calif., Water Is Contaminated But Residents Are Moving Back Anyway

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A drilling rig at work near a residential neighborhood in Erie, Colo. An overhaul of oil and gas regulations will give localities more control over where drilling can happen. Grace Hood/CPR hide caption

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Grace Hood/CPR

Colorado's Oil And Gas Regulators Must Now Consider Public Health And Safety

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A team of researchers found a surprisingly large amount of microplastic in the air in the Pyrenees mountains in southern France. VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

Microplastic Found Even In The Air In France's Pyrenees Mountains

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A bowl of Honey Toasted Kernza. General Mills made 6,000 boxes of the cereal and is passing them out to spread the word about perennial grains. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Can This Breakfast Cereal Help Save The Planet?

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President Trump hands out pens after signing an executive order aimed at making it easier for companies to pursue oil and gas pipeline projects. The president addressed an audience at the International Union of Operating Engineers International Training and Education Center in Texas. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

These Palmer amaranth — or pigweed — plants, seen growing in a greenhouse at Kansas State University, appear to be resistant to multiple herbicides. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

As Weeds Outsmart The Latest Weedkillers, Farmers Are Running Out Of Easy Options

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The shuttered San Onofre power plant is one of California's two nuclear power plants located near active earthquake faults. Spent nuclear fuel is being stored there currently. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice delivers his State of the State speech on Jan. 9 in Charleston, W.Va. Mining companies belonging to the Justice family owe millions in safety violations. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

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Tyler Evert/AP

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement are using Ian MacDonald's data to estimate the amount of oil being spilled at the Taylor Energy site. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

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Tegan Wendland/WWNO

This Oil Spill Has Been Leaking Into The Gulf For 14 Years

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Uncovered fiber rolls in front of a private home on Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Mass. Made from coconut fiber and filled with sand, they are designed to prevent beach erosion. Hayley Fager/WCAI hide caption

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Hayley Fager/WCAI

As Dunes Disappear, Fiber Rolls Protect Cape Cod Homes From Coastal Erosion

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Protesters gather outside the White House June 1, 2017, to protest President Trump's decision to withdraw the Unites States from the Paris climate change accord. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

'Losing Earth' Explores How Oil Industry Played Politics With The Planet's Fate

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After gaining approval from state lawmakers, New York will become the first U.S. city to levy fees on motorists who drive on some of its most congested streets. Here, traffic fills 42nd Street in Midtown Manhattan in January 2018. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images