Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Courtesy of TED

Marah Hardt: What Can We Learn From The Sex Lives Of Fish?

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Courtesy of Catherine Mohr

Catherine Mohr: A Love Story... That Begins With A Sea Urchin

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Brassica oleracea is a plant species that includes broccoli--as well as kale, cauliflower, collard greens and brussels sprouts. Inti St Clair/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Inti St Clair/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Yep, We Made Up Vegetables

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A sculpture created out of electronic waste in the likeness of Mount Rushmore and the G-7 leaders sits on a hill in Cornwall, England, near where the leaders of the world's wealthiest nations will meet. Jon Super/AP hide caption

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Jon Super/AP

2 Artists Want G-7 Leaders To End E-Waste. So They Sculpted Them Out Of Trash

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The gray whale known as Dubknuck has been coming to Puget Sound since 1991. Scientists believe a small pod of these whales has survived several die off events by developing a new feeding strategy. Parker Miles Blohm/KNKX hide caption

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Parker Miles Blohm/KNKX

A Group Of Gray Whales Survives Die-Off With An Annual Detour To Puget Sound

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Warmer temperatures are leading to emptier reservoirs across the West, such as Lake Oroville in Northern California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Cleveland - What Climate Equity Could Look Like

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A plan to trap baleen whales in Norway and test their hearing is getting pushback from some scientists and environmentalists who say it is too risky. VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty

Shalanda Baker listens during a confirmation hearing Tuesday to be Director of the Office of Minority Economic Impact for the Department of Energy. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

'Energy Justice' Nominee Brings Activist Voice To Biden's Climate Plans

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This 2019 photo provided by NOAA shows the Mauna Loa Atmospheric Baseline Observatory in Hawaii. Measurements taken at the station in May 2021 revealed the highest monthly average of atmospheric carbon dioxide in human history. Susan Cobb/NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory hide caption

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Susan Cobb/NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory

A man walks past sacks containing debris washed ashore from the X-Press Pearl on a beach in Colombo on Thursday. The plastic pellets will break down and be more difficult to clean up over time, marine biologist Asha de Vos says. Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP via Getty Images

The Ship Sinking Off Sri Lanka Looks Like A Lasting Environmental Disaster

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Scientists from NOAA Fisheries Service approach a young North Atlantic right whale in order to disentangle it. New research shows whales with severe entanglements in rope and fishing gear are experiencing stunted growth, and body lengths have been decreasing since 1981. NOAA News Archive 011811 hide caption

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NOAA News Archive 011811

Curled heads of wheat show the drought damage on Nicole Berg's ranch in southeast Washington state. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

Farmers Are Feeling The Pain As Drought Spreads In The Northwest

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The Rozenburg refinery in the Port of Rotterdam, Netherlands, is also home to other large companies producing petrol, diesel and oil including BP, Exxon Mobil, ESSO and Shell. Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images

Pressure On The World's Biggest Polluters Is Increasing. But Can It Force Change?

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Smoke billows from the Singapore-registered container ship X-Press Pearl on Wednesday. The ship carries more than 80 containers of dangerous goods, including 25 tons of nitric acid. Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP via Getty Images

Rainbow in Lenk, Switzerland Fredy Jeanrenaud / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Fredy Jeanrenaud / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Rainbows! How They Form And Why We See Them

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Scientists expect increasing marine heat waves to cause coral bleaching, which can result in reefs dying off. Kevin Lino/NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC/ESD hide caption

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Kevin Lino/NOAA/NMFS/PIFSC/ESD

Fearing Their Kids Will Inherit Dead Coral Reefs, Scientists Are Urging Bold Action

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Pictures of plaintiffs fly outside the court in The Hague, Netherlands, before Wednesday's ruling ordering Royal Dutch Shell to rein in its carbon emissions. Thousands of citizens joined the suit charging that Shell's fossil fuel investments endanger lives. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP